Woof vs Oof - What's the difference?

woof | oof |


As nouns the difference between woof and oof

is that woof is the set of yarns placed crosswise in a loom, interlaced with the warp, carried by the shuttle or woof can be the sound a dog makes when barking while oof is money.

As interjections the difference between woof and oof

is that woof is (humorous) expression of strong physical attraction for someone while oof is a sound mimicking the loss of air, as if someone's solar plexus had just been struck.

As a verb woof

is to make a woofing sound.

As an acronym woof

is (marketing) well off older folks.

woof

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) oof, owf, from (etyl) , from Proto-Germanic *webanan'' (to weave), from Proto-Indo-European ''*webh-''/''*wobh- (to weave, to lace together).

Noun

(en noun)
  • the set of yarns placed crosswise in a loom, interlaced with the warp, carried by the shuttle.
  • A fabric; the texture of a fabric.
  • :* {{quote-book
  • , year=1803 , year_published=2008 , edition= , editor= , author=Earsmus Darwin , title=The Temple of Nature , chapter= citation , genre= , publisher=The Gutenberg Project , isbn= , page= , passage=O'er her fine waist the purfled woof descends; }}
    Synonyms
    * (crosswise thread or yarn) weft

    Etymology 2

    Onomatopoeic.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The sound a dog makes when barking.
  • Coordinate terms
    * (sound of a dog) bark, bow wow, growl, howl, snarl, whimper, whine, yap, yelp, yip

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • (humorous) Expression of strong physical attraction for someone.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make a woofing sound
  • Etymology 3

    Acronym

    (Acronym) (head)
  • (marketing) Well Off Older Folks
  • (agriculture) Work on organic farm
  • English onomatopoeias ----

    oof

    English

    Etymology 1

    (onomatopoeia)

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • A sound mimicking the loss of air, as if someone's solar plexus had just been struck.
  • Etymology 2

    From (ooftish) or possibly connected with (etyl)

    Noun

    (-)
  • Money.
  • * 1888 , , Colonel Quaritch V.C. ( archive.org ebook), page 232:
  • “Oh,” Johnnie was saying, “so Quest is his name, is it, and he lives in a city called Boisingham, does he? Is he an oof bird?” (rich)
    “Rather,” answered the Tiger, “if only one can make the dollars run, but he's a nasty mean boy, he is.
  • * 1911–1912 , published 1916, , The World For Sale , book 2, chapter 10 ( Gutenberg ebook], [http://www.archive.org/details/worldforsaleano00parkgoog archive.org ebook):
  • What's he after? Oof—oof—oof , that's what he's after. He's for his own pocket, he's for being boss of all the woolly West. He's after keeping us poor and making himself rich.
    Derived terms
    * oof-bird * oofless * oofy

    Anagrams

    * foo English onomatopoeias