Visit vs Observe - What's the difference?

visit | observe |


As verbs the difference between visit and observe

is that visit is to shriek, scream, shrill, screech, squeal, squeak while observe is .

visit

English

Verb

(en verb)
  • Of God: to appear to (someone) to comfort, bless, or chastise or punish them. (Now generally merged into later senses, below.)
  • * Bible, (w) i. 68
  • [God] hath visited and redeemed his people.
  • * 1611 , Bible , Authorized (King James) Version, (w) I.6:
  • Then she arose with her daughters in law, that she might return from the country of Moab: for she had heard in the country of Moab how that the LORD had visited his people in giving them bread.
  • To habitually go to (someone in distress, sickness etc.) to comfort them. (Now generally merged into later senses, below.)
  • (intransitive) To go and meet (a person) as an act of friendliness or sociability.
  • * 1788 , (Edward Gibbon), (The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire) , volume 68:
  • Her life was spared by the clemency of the emperor, but he visited the pomp and treasures of her palace.
  • Of a sickness, misfortune etc.: to afflict (someone).
  • * 1890 , (James George Frazer), (The Golden Bough) :
  • There used to be a sharp contest as to where the effigy was to be made, for the people thought that the house from which it was carried forth would not be visited with death that year.
  • To inflict punishment, vengeance for (an offense) (on) or (upon) someone.
  • * 2011 , John Mullan, The Guardian , 2 Dec 2011:
  • If this were an Ibsen play, we would be thinking of the sins of one generation being visited upon another, he said.
  • To go to (a shrine, temple etc.) for worship. (Now generally merged into later senses, below.)
  • To go to (a place) for pleasure, on an errand, etc.
  • * , chapter=19
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Nothing was too small to receive attention, if a supervising eye could suggest improvements likely to conduce to the common welfare. Mr. Gordon Burnage, for instance, personally visited dust-bins and back premises, accompanied by a sort of village bailiff, going his round like a commanding officer doing billets.}}

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A single act of .
  • *{{quote-book, year=1899, author=(Stephen Crane)
  • , title=, chapter=1 , passage=There was some laughter, and Roddle was left free to expand his ideas on the periodic visits of cowboys to the town. “Mason Rickets, he had ten big punkins a-sittin' in front of his store, an' them fellers from the Upside-down-F ranch shot 'em up […].”}}
  • A meeting with a doctor at their surgery or the doctor's at one's home.
  • Derived terms

    * conjugal visit * flying visit * visitation * visitor

    Statistics

    * 1000 English basic words ----

    observe

    English

    Verb

    (observ)
  • (lb) To notice or view, especially carefully or with attention to detail.
  • :
  • *1892 , (Arthur Conan Doyle),
  • *:“One horse?” interjected Holmes. ¶ “Yes, only one.” ¶ “Did you observe the colour?”
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-03, author=Frank Fish, George Lauder
  • , volume=101, issue=2, page=114, magazine=(American Scientist) , title= Not Just Going with the Flow , passage=An extreme version of vorticity is a vortex . The vortex is a spinning, cyclonic mass of fluid, which can be observed in the rotation of water going down a drain, as well as in smoke rings, tornados and hurricanes.}}
  • (lb) To follow or obey the custom, practice, or rules (especially of a religion).
  • :
  • *Bible, (w)
  • *:Ye shall observe the feast of unleavened bread.
  • *{{quote-news, year=2011, date=November 10, author=Jeremy Wilson, work=Telegraph
  • , title= England Under 21 5 Iceland Under 21 0: match report , passage=A sell-out crowd of 10,000 then observed perfectly a period of silence before the team revealed their black armbands, complete with stitched-in poppies, for the match. After Fifa’s about-turn, it must have been a frantic few days for the England kit manufacturer. The on-field challenge was altogether more straightforward. }}
  • (lb) To comment on something; to make an observation.
  • :
  • *
  • *:Elbows almost touching they leaned at ease, idly reading the almost obliterated lines engraved there. ¶ ("I never) understood it," she observed , lightly scornful. "What occult meaning has a sun-dial for the spooney? I'm sure I don't want to read riddles in a strange gentleman's optics."
  • Synonyms

    * (follow a custom) celebrate

    Derived terms

    * observance * observant * observation * observational * observatory * observer

    Anagrams

    * * English reporting verbs ----