Oblate vs Oblique - What's the difference?

oblate | oblique |


As nouns the difference between oblate and oblique

is that oblate is a person dedicated to a life of religion or monasticism, especially a member of an order without religious vows or a lay member of a religious community while oblique is an oblique line.

As adjectives the difference between oblate and oblique

is that oblate is flattened or depressed at the poles while oblique is not erect or perpendicular; neither parallel to, nor at right angles from, the base; slanting; inclined.

As a verb oblique is

to deviate from a perpendicular line; to move in an oblique direction.

oblate

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) (m) and its source, post-classical (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • (Roman Catholic Church) A person dedicated to a life of religion or monasticism, especially a member of an order without religious vows or a lay member of a religious community.
  • A child given up by its parents into the keeping or dedication of a religious order or house.
  • * 2007', The Venerable Bede started as an '''oblate at St Paul's, Jarrow, but by the time of his death in 735 was surely the most learned man in Europe. — Tom Shippey, ‘I Lerne Song’, ''London Review of Books 29:4, p. 19
  • Etymology 2

    From ).

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Flattened or depressed at the poles.
  • The Earth is an oblate spheroid.
  • * 1922', Why should I not speak to him or to any human being who walks upright upon this '''oblate orange? — James Joyce, ''Ulysses
  • * 1997', ‘ ’Tis prolate, still,’ with a long dejected Geordie O. ‘Isn’t it…?’ ‘I’m an Astronomer,– trust me, ’tis gone well to '''oblate .’ — Thomas Pynchon, ''Mason & Dixon
  • Antonyms
    * (l)
    See also
    * (l)

    Anagrams

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    oblique

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Not erect or perpendicular; neither parallel to, nor at right angles from, the base; slanting; inclined.
  • * Cheyne
  • It has a direction oblique to that of the former motion.
  • Not straightforward; indirect; obscure; hence, disingenuous; underhand; perverse; sinister.
  • * Drayton
  • The love we bear our friends Hath in it certain oblique ends.
  • * De Quincey
  • This mode of oblique research, when a more direct one is denied, we find to be the only one in our power.
  • * Wordsworth
  • Then would be closed the restless, oblique eye / That looks for evil, like a treacherous spy.
  • Not direct in descent; not following the line of father and son; collateral.
  • * Baker
  • His natural affection in a direct line was strong, in an oblique but weak.
  • (botany, of leaves) Having the base of the blade asymmetrical, with one side larger or extending further than the other.
  • Derived terms

    * oblique angle * oblique arch * oblique ascension * oblique bridge * oblique case * oblique circle * oblique fire * oblique flank * oblique line * oblique motion * oblique muscle * oblique narration * oblique plane * oblique sailing * oblique speech * oblique sphere * oblique step * oblique system of coordinates

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (geometry) An oblique line.
  • The punctuation sign "/"
  • (grammar) The oblique case.
  • Verb

  • To deviate from a perpendicular line; to move in an oblique direction.
  • * Projecting his person towards it in a line which obliqued from the bottom of his spine. - Sir. W. Scott.
  • (military) To march in a direction oblique to the line of the column or platoon; — formerly accomplished by oblique steps, now by direct steps, the men half-facing either to the right or left.
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