Objection vs Stickle - What's the difference?

objection | stickle |


As nouns the difference between objection and stickle

is that objection is the act of objecting while stickle is (uk|dialect) a shallow rapid in a river.

As a verb stickle is

(obsolete) to act as referee or arbiter; to mediate.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

objection

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • The act of objecting.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-07, author= Ed Pilkington
  • , volume=188, issue=26, page=6, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= ‘Killer robots’ should be banned in advance, UN told , passage=In his submission to the UN, [Christof] Heyns points to the experience of drones. Unmanned aerial vehicles were intended initially only for surveillance, and their use for offensive purposes was prohibited, yet once strategists realised their perceived advantages as a means of carrying out targeted killings, all objections were swept out of the way.}}
  • A statement expressing opposition, or a reason or cause for expressing opposition (generally followed by the adposition to ).
  • (legal) An official protest raised in a court of law during a legal trial over a violation of the rules of the court by the opposing party.
  • Usage notes

    * Adjectives often used with "objection": serious, conscientious, fatal, grave, etc. * Verbs often used with "objection": raise, make, meet, answer, etc.

    stickle

    English

    Verb

    (en-verb)
  • (obsolete) To act as referee or arbiter; to mediate.
  • To argue or struggle (for).
  • * 1897 , Henry James, What Maisie Knew :
  • ‘She has other people than poor little you to think about, and has gone abroad with them; so you needn't be in the least afraid she'll stickle this time for her rights.’
  • To raise objections; to argue stubbornly, especially over minor or trivial matters.
  • (obsolete) To separate, as combatants; hence, to quiet, to appease, as disputants.
  • * Drayton
  • Which [question] violently they pursue, / Nor stickled would they be.
  • (obsolete) To intervene in; to stop, or put an end to, by intervening.
  • * Sir Philip Sidney
  • They ran to him, and, pulling him back by force, stickled that unnatural fray.
  • (obsolete) To separate combatants by intervening.
  • * Dryden
  • When he [the angel] sees half of the Christians killed, and the rest in a fair way of being routed, he stickles betwixt the remainder of God's host and the race of fiends.
  • (obsolete) To contend, contest, or altercate, especially in a pertinacious manner on insufficient grounds.
  • * Hudibras
  • Fortune, as she's wont, turned fickle, / And for the foe began to stickle .
  • * Dryden
  • for paltry punk they roar and stickle
  • * Hazlitt
  • the obstinacy with which he stickles for the wrong

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (UK, dialect) A shallow rapid in a river.
  • (UK, dialect) The current below a waterfall.
  • * W. Browne
  • Patient anglers, standing all the day / Near to some shallow stickle or deep bay.

    Anagrams

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