Seizure vs Obeisance - What's the difference?

seizure | obeisance |


As nouns the difference between seizure and obeisance

is that seizure is the act of taking possession, as by force or right of law while obeisance is demonstration of an obedient attitude, especially by bowing deeply; a deep bow which demonstrates such an attitude.

seizure

English

Noun

(en noun) (Search and seizure) (wikipedia seizure)
  • The act of taking possession, as by force or right of law.
  • the seizure of a thief, a property, a throne, etc.
    The search warrant permitted the seizure of evidence.
  • * 1874 , (Marcus Clarke), (For the Term of His Natural Life) Chapter VII
  • As yet there had been no alarm of fever. The three seizures had excited some comment, however, and had it not been for the counter-excitement of the burning ship, it is possible that Pine's precaution would have been thrown away
  • A sudden attack or convulsion, (e.g. an epileptic seizure).
  • He fell to the floor and convulsed when the epilectic seizure occurred.
  • A sudden onset of pain or emotion.
  • He felt the sudden seizure of pain as the heart attack began.
  • (obsolete) retention within one's grasp or power; possession; ownership
  • * Dryden
  • Make o'er thy honour by a deed of trust, / And give me seizure of the mighty wealth.
  • That which is seized, or taken possession of; a thing laid hold of, or possessed.
  • obeisance

    English

    Alternative forms

    * obeisaunce, obeissance, abaisance (obsolete)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Demonstration of an obedient attitude, especially by bowing deeply; a deep bow which demonstrates such an attitude.
  • * 1845 , ":
  • Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter,
    In there stepped a stately raven of the saintly days of yore;
    Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he;
    But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door —
    Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door —
    Perched, and sat, and nothing more.
  • * 1962 , , How To Do Things With Words (OUP paperback edition), p. 69:
  • The situation in the case of actions which are non-linguistic but similar to performative utterances in that they are the performance of a conventional action (here ritual or ceremonial) is rather like this: suppose I bow deeply before you; it might not be clear whether I am doing obeisance to you or, say, stooping to observe the flora or to ease my indigestion.
  • An obedient attitude.
  • Usage notes

    * Usually in the phrases do obeisance'' or ''make obeisance . English words not following the I before E except after C rule