Yahoo vs Oath - What's the difference?

yahoo | oath |


As nouns the difference between yahoo and oath

is that yahoo is (literature) one of a race of brutes, who look and act similar to men, that inhabit the same land as the civilized houyhnhnms or yahoo can be (informal) an employee of the internet company while oath is a solemn pledge or promise to a god, king, or another person, to attest to the truth of a statement or contract.

As a verb oath is

(archaic) to pledge.

yahoo

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A rough, coarse, or uncouth person; yokel; lout.
  • A loud boisterous person.
  • (pejorative) A white person from the former Confederate States of America (i.e., Southern United States).
  • (cryptozoology) A humanoid cryptid said to exist in parts of eastern Australia, and also reported in the Bahamas.
  • 1835: The natives are greatly terrrified by the sight of a person in a mask calling him "devil" or Yah-hoo, which signifies evil spirit.'' — James Holman, ''Travels , 1835 (quoted by Malcolm Smith, above)
    1985: Yahoos in the Bahamas'' — title of paper by Michael Raynal, ''Cryptozoology , volume 4, 1985

    Synonyms

    * yokel, lout

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • An exclamation of joy.
  • A battle cry.
  • oath

    English

    (wikipedia oath)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A solemn pledge or promise to a god, king, or another person, to attest to the truth of a statement or contract
  • * 1924 , Aristotle, Metaphysics , Translated by W. D. Ross. Nashotah, Wisconsin, USA: The Classical Library, 2001. Available at: . Book 1, Part 3.
  • for they made Ocean and Tethys the parents of creation, and described the oath of the gods as being by water,
  • The affirmed statement or promise accepted as equivalent to an oath .
  • A light or insulting use of a solemn pledge or promise to a god, king or another person, to attest to the truth of a statement or contract the name of a deity in a profanity, as in swearing oaths .
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-14, author= Sam Leith
  • , volume=189, issue=1, page=37, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Where the profound meets the profane , passage=Swearing doesn't just mean what we now understand by "dirty words". It is entwined, in social and linguistic history, with the other sort of swearing: vows and oaths'. Consider for a moment the origins of almost any word we have for bad language – "profanity", "curses", "' oaths " and "swearing" itself.}}
  • A curse.
  • (legal) An affirmation of the truth of a statement.
  • Synonyms

  • pledge, vow, avowal
  • Derived terms

    * oathbound * oathbreaker * oathless * under oath

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (archaic) to pledge
  • shouting out (as in 'oathing obsenities')
  • Anagrams

    * (l)