Shed vs Null - What's the difference?

shed | null |


As nouns the difference between shed and null

is that shed is (weaving) an area between upper and lower warp yarns through which the weft is woven or shed can be a slight or temporary structure built to shade or shelter something; a structure usually open in front; an outbuilding; a hut while null is zero, nil; the cardinal number before einn.

As a verb shed

is (transitive|obsolete|uk|dialect) to part or divide.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

shed

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) sheden, scheden, schoden, from (etyl) 'he cuts off'). Related to (l); (l).

Verb

  • (transitive, obsolete, UK, dialect) To part or divide.
  • A metal comb shed her golden hair.
    (Robert of Brunne)
  • (ambitransitive) To part with, separate from, leave off; cast off, let fall, be divested of.
  • You must shed your fear of the unknown before you can proceed.
    When we found the snake, it was in the process of shedding its skin.
  • * Mortimer
  • White oats are apt to shed most as they lie, and black as they stand.
  • * 2012 November 2, Ken Belson, "[http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/03/sports/new-york-city-marathon-will-not-be-held-sunday.html?hp&_r=0]," New York Times (retrieved 2 November 2012):
  • She called on all the marathoners to go to Staten Island to help with the clean-up effort and to bring the clothes they would have shed at the start to shelters or other places where displaced people were in need.
  • (archaic) To pour; to make flow.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Did Romeo's hand shed Tybalt's blood?
  • To allow to flow or fall.
  • I didn't shed many tears when he left me.
    A tarpaulin sheds water.
  • To radiate, cast, give off (light); see also shed light on.
  • Can you shed any light on this problem?
  • (obsolete) To pour forth, give off, impart.
  • * 1526 , (William Tyndale), trans. Bible , Acts II:
  • Sence now that he by the right honde of god exalted is, and hath receaved off the father the promys off the holy goost, he hath sheed forthe that which ye nowe se and heare.
  • (obsolete) To fall in drops; to pour.
  • * Chaucer
  • Such a rain down from the welkin shadde .
  • To sprinkle; to intersperse; to cover.
  • * Ben Jonson
  • Her hair is shed with grey.
  • (weaving) To divide, as the warp threads, so as to form a shed, or passageway, for the shuttle.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) schede, schode, (m), .

    Alternative forms

    * (dialectal) * (obsolete)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (weaving) An area between upper and lower warp yarns through which the weft is woven.
  • (obsolete) A distinction or dividing-line.
  • (obsolete) A parting in the hair.
  • (obsolete) An area of land as distinguished from those around it.
  • Derived terms
    * watershed

    Etymology 3

    Variant of shade .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A slight or temporary structure built to shade or shelter something; a structure usually open in front; an outbuilding; a hut.
  • a wagon shed'''; a wood '''shed'''; a garden '''shed
  • (British, derogatory, informal) An automobile which is old, worn-out, slow, or otherwise of poor quality.
  • (British, rail transportation) A locomotive.
  • *'>citation
  • Derived terms
    * * * * *

    See also

    * cabin * hovel * hut * kiosk * outbuilding * pergola * shack * shanty * stall * storehouse

    null

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A non-existent or empty value or set of values.
  • Zero]] quantity of [[expression, expressions; nothing.
  • (Francis Bacon)
  • Something that has no force or meaning.
  • (computing) the ASCII or Unicode character (), represented by a zero value, that indicates no character and is sometimes used as a string terminator.
  • (computing) the attribute of an entity that has no valid value.
  • Since no date of birth was entered for the patient, his age is null .
  • One of the beads in nulled work.
  • (statistics) null hypothesis
  • Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Having no validity, "null and void"
  • insignificant
  • * 1924 , Marcel Proust, Within a Budding Grove :
  • In proportion as we descend the social scale our snobbishness fastens on to mere nothings which are perhaps no more null than the distinctions observed by the aristocracy, but, being more obscure, more peculiar to the individual, take us more by surprise.
  • absent or non-existent
  • (mathematics) of the null set
  • (mathematics) of or comprising a value of precisely zero
  • (genetics, of a mutation) causing a complete loss of gene function, amorphic.
  • Derived terms

    * nullity

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • to nullify; to annul
  • (Milton)

    See also

    * nil ----