Assumpsit vs Noun - What's the difference?

assumpsit | noun |


As nouns the difference between assumpsit and noun

is that assumpsit is (legal) a promise or undertaking, either express or implied, founded on a consideration while noun is (grammar|sensu lato) a name of a thing either a noun substantive, which can stand alone and does not require another word to be joined with it to show its signification, or a noun adjective, which can not stand by itself, but requires to be joined with some other word, in order to make sense.

As a verb noun is

to convert a word to a noun.

assumpsit

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • (legal) A promise or undertaking, either express or implied, founded on a consideration.
  • (legal) An action to recover damages for breach or nonperformance of such a promise.
  • (Wharton)
    (Webster 1913) ----

    noun

    English

    (wikipedia noun)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (grammar, sensu lato) A name of a thing. Either a noun substantive, which can stand alone and does not require another word to be joined with it to show its signification, or a noun adjective, which can not stand by itself, but requires to be joined with some other word, in order to make sense.
  • (grammar, sensu stricto) A word that can be used to refer to a person, animal, place, thing, phenomenon, substance, quality, or idea; one of the basic parts of speech in many languages, including English.
  • Usage notes

    * (sensu stricto) In English (and in many other languages), a noun can serve as the subject or object of a verb. For example, the English words (table) and (computer) are nouns. See .

    Synonyms

    * name, nameword * (sensu stricto) noun substantive, substantive

    Hyponyms

    * (sensu lato) noun substantive = substantive, noun adjective = adjective * (sensu stricto) See also

    Derived terms

    * abstract noun * adjectival noun * attributive noun * collective noun * common noun * concrete noun * count noun * mass noun * non-count noun * noun adjunct * noun clause * noun of assemblage * noun of multitude * noun phrase * plural noun * pronoun * proper noun * uncount noun

    See also

    * countable

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To convert a word to a noun.
  • * 1992 , Lewis Acrelius Froman, Language and Power: Books III, IV, and V
  • For example, that females are different from but equal to males is oxymoronic by virtue of the nouned status of female and male as kinds of persons.
  • * 2000 , Andrew J. DuBrin, The complete idiot's guide to leadership
  • However, too much nouning makes you sound bureaucratic, immature, and verbally challenged. Top executives convert far fewer nouns into verbs than do workers at lower levels.

    Anagrams

    * English autological terms ----