What's the difference between
and
Enter two words to compare and contrast their definitions, origins, and synonyms to better understand how those words are related.

Grasp vs Notion - What's the difference?

grasp | notion |

As an acronym grasp

is (software|object-oriented design).

As a noun notion is

mental]] apprehension of whatever may be known, [[think|thought, or imagined; idea, concept.

grasp

English

(wikipedia grasp)

Verb

(en verb)
  • To grip; to take hold, particularly with the hand.
  • (senseid)To understand.
  • I have never been able to grasp the concept of infinity .

    Derived terms

    * grasp the nettle

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Grip.
  • *
  • *:Turning back, then, toward the basement staircase, she began to grope her way through blinding darkness, but had taken only a few uncertain steps when, of a sudden, she stopped short and for a little stood like a stricken thing, quite motionless save that she quaked to her very marrow in the grasp of a great and enervating fear.
  • (senseid)Understanding.
  • That which is accessible; that which is within one's reach or ability.
  • :
  • notion

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Mental]] apprehension of whatever may be known, [[think, thought, or imagined; idea, concept.
  • * (Isaac Newton) (1642-1727)
  • What hath been generally agreed on, I content myself to assume under the notion of principles.
  • * (George Cheyne) (1671-1743)
  • Few agree in their notions about these words.
  • * (Isaac Watts) (1674-1748)
  • That notion of hunger, cold, sound, color, thought, wish, or fear which is in the mind, is called the "idea" of hunger, cold, etc.
  • * (Alexander Hamilton) (ca.1756-1804)
  • Notion , again, signifies either the act of apprehending, signalizing, that is, the remarking or taking note of, the various notes, marks, or characters of an object which its qualities afford, or the result of that act.
  • A sentiment; an opinion.
  • * (Joseph Addison) (1672-1719)
  • The extravagant notion they entertain of themselves.
  • * (John Henry Newman) (1801-1890)
  • A perverse will easily collects together a system of notions to justify itself in its obliquity.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1935, author= George Goodchild
  • , title=Death on the Centre Court, chapter=1 , passage=ÔÇťAnthea hasn't a notion in her head but to vamp a lot of silly mugwumps. She's set her heart on that tennis bloke
  • (label) Sense; mind. Shakespeare.
  • (label) An invention; an ingenious device; a knickknack.
  • Any small article used in sewing and haberdashery, such as a button or zipper.
  • (label) Inclination; intention; disposition.
  • See also

    * concept * conception * meaning