Noise vs Bark - What's the difference?

noise | bark |


As nouns the difference between noise and bark

is that noise is various sounds, usually unwanted while bark is the short, loud, explosive sound uttered by a dog or bark can be (countable|uncountable) the exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree or bark can be (obsolete) a small sailing vessel, eg a pinnace or a fishing smack; a rowing boat or barge.

As verbs the difference between noise and bark

is that noise is to make a noise; to sound while bark is to make a short, loud, explosive noise with the vocal organs (said of animals, especially dogs) or bark can be to strip the bark from; to peel.

noise

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • Various sounds, usually unwanted.
  • * (Francis Bacon) (1561-1626)
  • The heavens turn about in a most rapid motion without noise to us perceived.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1959, author=(Georgette Heyer), title=(The Unknown Ajax), chapter=1
  • , passage=Charles had not been employed above six months at Darracott Place, but he was not such a whopstraw as to make the least noise in the performance of his duties when his lordship was out of humour.}}
  • Sound or signal generated by random fluctuations.
  • (label) Unwanted part of a signal. (Signal to noise ratio )
  • (label) The measured level of variation in gene expression among cells, regardless of source, within a supposedly identical population.
  • Rumour or complaint.
  • * T. Baker
  • What noise have we had about transplantation of diseases and transfusion of blood!
  • * Spectator
  • Socrates lived in Athens during the great plague which has made so much noise in all ages.
  • (obsolete) Music, in general; a concert; also, a company of musicians; a band.
  • * (Ben Jonson) (1572-1637)
  • The king has his noise of gypsies.
    (Milton)

    Derived terms

    * noises off * noiseless

    Synonyms

    * (Various sounds) sound

    Hyponyms

    * (Various sounds) bang, boom, crash, thud

    References

    (Genetics meaning)'' " Noise in Gene Expression: Origins, Consequences, and Control." Jonathan M. Raser and Erin K. O'Shea (2005). ''Science . 309 (5743):2010-2013.

    Verb

    (nois)
  • To make a noise; to sound.
  • (Milton)
  • To spread news of; to spread as rumor or gossip.
  • * 1526 , (William Tyndale), trans. Bible , Acts II:
  • When this was noysed aboute, the multitude cam togedder and were astonyed, because that every man herde them speake in his awne tongue.

    Anagrams

    * * 1000 English basic words ----

    bark

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) barken, berken, borken, from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make a short, loud, explosive noise with the vocal organs (said of animals, especially dogs).
  • The neighbour's dog is always barking .
    The seal barked as the zookeeper threw fish into its enclosure.
  • To make a clamor; to make importunate outcries.
  • * (rfdate), Tyndale.
  • They bark , and say the Scripture maketh heretics.
  • * (rfdate), Fuller
  • Where there is the barking of the belly, there no other commands will be heard, much less obeyed. .
  • To speak sharply.
  • The sergeant barked an order.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011
  • , date=January 5 , author=Mark Ashenden , title=Wolverhampton 1 - 0 Chelsea , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=While McCarthy prowled the touchline barking orders, his opposite number watched on motionless and expressionless and, with 25 minutes to go, decided to throw on Nicolas Anelka for Kalou.}}
    Usage notes
    Historically, bork'' existed as a past tense form and ''borken as a past participle, but both forms are now obsolete.
    Derived terms
    * bark up the wrong tree * barking * barking dogs never bite * bebark * dogs bark *
    Synonyms
    * latrate (obsolete)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The short, loud, explosive sound uttered by a dog.
  • A similar sound made by some other animals.
  • (figuratively) An abrupt loud vocal utterance.
  • * circa 1921 , The Cambridge History of English and American Literature , vol 11:
  • Fox’s clumsy figure, negligently dressed in blue and buff, seemed unprepossessing; only his shaggy eyebrows added to the expression of his face; his voice would rise to a bark in excitement.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) bark, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (wikipedia bark)
  • (countable, uncountable) The exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree.
  • * '>citation
  • Moving about 70 miles per hour, it crashed through the sturdy old-growth trees, snapping their limbs and shredding bark from their trunks.
  • (medicine) Peruvian bark or Jesuit's bark, the bark of the cinchona from which quinine is produced.
  • The crust formed on barbecued meat that has had a rub applied to it.
  • * 2009 , Julie Reinhardt, She-Smoke: A Backyard Barbecue Book , page 151:
  • This softens the meat further, but at some loss of crunch to the bark .
    Usage notes
    Usually uncountable; bark may be countable when referring to the barks of different types of tree.
    Synonyms
    * (exterior covering of a tree) rind

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To strip the bark from; to peel.
  • To abrade or rub off any outer covering from.
  • to bark one’s heel
  • To girdle.
  • To cover or inclose with bark, or as with bark.
  • bark the roof of a hut

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) , from Egyptian b?re .

    Alternative forms

    * barque

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A small sailing vessel, e.g. a pinnace or a fishing smack; a rowing boat or barge.
  • (poetic) a sailing vessel or boat of any kind.
  • * circa 1609 , William Shakespeare, Sonnet 116:
  • It is the star to every wandering bark
  • * circa 1880 , among the Poems of Emily Dickinson:
  • Whether my bark went down at sea, Whether she met with gales,
  • (nautical) A three-masted vessel, having her foremast and mainmast square-rigged, and her mizzenmast schooner-rigged.