Night vs Infomercial - What's the difference?

night | infomercial |


As nouns the difference between night and infomercial

is that night is (countable) the period between sunset and sunrise, when a location faces far away from the sun, thus when the sky is dark while infomercial is an especially long television commercial, typically between thirty minutes and one hour long, that is usually sold as a block to advertisers late at night to fund the operations of a television network.

As a interjection night

is short for good night.

As a verb night

is to spend a night (in a place), to overnight.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

night

English

(wikipedia night)

Alternative forms

* nite (informal)

Noun

  • (lb) The period between sunset and sunrise, when a location faces far away from the sun, thus when the sky is dark.
  • :
  • *
  • *:The Bat—they called him the Bat. Like a bat he chose the night hours for his work of rapine; like a bat he struck and vanished, pouncingly, noiselessly; like a bat he never showed himself to the face of the day.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-19, author= Ian Sample
  • , volume=189, issue=6, page=34, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Irregular bedtimes may affect children's brains , passage=Irregular bedtimes may disrupt healthy brain development in young children, according to a study of intelligence and sleeping habits.  ¶ Going to bed at a different time each night affected girls more than boys, but both fared worse on mental tasks than children who had a set bedtime, researchers found.}}
  • (lb) An evening or night spent at a particular activity.
  • :
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-08, volume=407, issue=8839, page=52, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= The new masters and commanders , passage=From the ground, Colombo’s port does not look like much. Those entering it are greeted by wire fences, walls dating back to colonial times and security posts. For mariners leaving the port after lonely nights on the high seas, the delights of the B52 Night Club and Stallion Pub lie a stumble away.}}
  • (lb) A night (and part of the days before and after it) spent in a hotel or other accommodation.
  • :
  • (lb) Nightfall.
  • :
  • (lb) Darkness.
  • :
  • (lb) A dark blue colour, midnight blue.
  • :
  • A night's worth of competitions, generally one game.
  • Synonyms

    * (evening or night spent at a particular activity) evening * (quality of sleep) sleep * (nightfall) dark, dusk, nightfall, sundown, sunset, twilight * (darkness) blackness, darkness, gloom, obscurity, shadow

    Antonyms

    * (period between sunset and sunrise) day * (darkness) brightness, daylight, light

    See also

    *

    Derived terms

    * all-night * all-nighter * at night * day and night * fly-by-night * first night * goodnight * lady of the night * last night * midnight * night and day * night-bat * night blindness * nightcap * nightclub * night court * night crawler * nightdress * night emission * nightfall * nightgown * nightie, nighty * night letter * nightlife * nightlight * nightly * nightmare * night-night * night owl * nightpiece * night-raven * night shift * nightshirt * night soil * nighttime, night-time * night terror * night watch * overnight * ships that pass in the night * the night is young * tonight * tomorrow night * Twelfth Night

    Interjection

    (en-interj)!
  • Short for good night
  • Night all! Thanks for a great evening!

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To spend a night (in a place), to overnight.
  • *2008 , Richard F. Burton, Arabian Nights, in 16 volumes , p.284:
  • *:"So I took seat and ate somewhat of my vivers, my horse also feeding upon his fodder, and we nighted in that spot and next morning I set out."
  • Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * (l), (l) 1000 English basic words ----

    infomercial

    English

    Alternative forms

    * infommercial

    Noun

    (wikipedia infomercial) (en noun)
  • An especially long television commercial, typically between thirty minutes and one hour long, that is usually sold as a block to advertisers late at night to fund the operations of a television network.
  • Hypernyms

    * commercial