Cool vs Neat - What's the difference?

cool | neat |


As an acronym cool

is (computing) clips object]]-oriented [[language|language .

As a noun neat is

(archaic) a bull or cow or neat can be an artificial intelligence researcher who believes that solutions should be elegant, clear and provably correct compare scruffy.

As an adjective neat is

clean, tidy; free from dirt or impurities.

cool

English

Alternative forms

* (slang) coo, kewl, kool, qewl, qool

Etymology 1

From (etyl), from (etyl) . Related to (l).

Adjective

(er)
  • Having a slightly low temperature; mildly or pleasantly cold.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=8 , passage=The day was cool and snappy for August, and the Rise all green with a lavish nature. Now we plunged into a deep shade with the boughs lacing each other overhead, and crossed dainty, rustic bridges over the cold trout-streams, the boards giving back the clatter of our horses' feet:
  • Allowing or suggesting heat relief.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=2 citation , passage=Now that she had rested and had fed from the luncheon tray Mrs. Broome had just removed, she had reverted to her normal gaiety.  She looked cool in a grey tailored cotton dress with a terracotta scarf and shoes and her hair a black silk helmet.}}
  • Of a person, not showing emotion, calm and in self-control.
  • Unenthusiastic, lukewarm, skeptical.
  • Calmly audacious.
  • * (Nathaniel Hawthorne) (1804-1864)
  • Its cool stare of familiarity was intolerable.
  • * 1944 November 28, Irving Brecher and Fred F. Finklehoffe, Meet Me in St. Louis , Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer:
  • My father was talking to the World's Fair Commission yesterday, and they estimate it's going to cost a cool fifty million.
  • (label) Of a person, knowing what to do and how to behave; considered popular by others.
  • (label) In fashion, part of or fitting the in crowd; originally hipster slang.
  • * 2008 , Lou Schuler, "Foreward", in'' Nate Green, ''Built for Show , page xii
  • The fact that I was middle-aged, bald, married, and raising girls instead of chasing them didn't really bother me. Muscles are cool at any age.
  • (label) Of an action, all right; acceptable; that does not present a problem.
  • (label) A dismissal of a comment perceived as boring or pointless.
  • (label) Of a person, not upset by circumstances that might ordinarily be upsetting.
  • * (Henry Fielding) (1707-1754)
  • He had lost a cool hundred.
  • * (Charles Dickens) (1812-1870)
  • leaving a cool four thousand to Mr. Matthew Pocket
    Synonyms
    * (having a slightly low temperature) chilly * (not showing emotion) distant, phlegmatic, standoffish, unemotional * (in fashion) ** (standard) , fashionable, in fashion, modish, stylish ** (colloquial or slang) happening, hip, in, trendy * (acceptable) acceptable, all right, OK * (not upset) easy, fine, not bothered, not fussed'''
    Antonyms
    * (having a slightly low temperature) lukewarm, tepid, warm * (not showing emotion) passionate * (knowing what to do and how to behave) awkward, uncool * (in fashion) , old hat, out, out of fashion * (acceptable) not cricket (UK), not on, unacceptable * (not upset) bothered, upset * (unenthusiastic) warm
    Derived terms
    * cool head * coolish * coolly * coolness * keep one's cool * lose one's cool * uncool
    Quotations
    * The earliest use of the word in this way seems to be in ' "The Moonstone" 1868: *: "She has been a guest of yours at this house," I answered. "May I venture to suggest — if nothing was said about me beforehand — that I might see her here?" *: "Cool!" said Mr. Bruff. With that one word of comment on the reply that I had made to him, he took another turn up and down the room. *: "In plain English," he said, "my house is to be turned into a trap to catch Rachel ... * In 1602, Shakespeare wrote that Queen Gertrude told Hamlet: *: "O gentle son, Upon the heat and flame of thy distemper, Sprinkle cool patience."

    Noun

    (-)
  • A moderate or refreshing state of cold; moderate temperature of the air between hot and cold; coolness.
  • in the cool of the morning
  • A calm temperament.
  • Synonyms
    *(calm temperament) calmness, composure

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) colen, from (etyl) , altered to resemble the adjective cool. See (l).

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (literally) To lose heat, to get colder.
  • I like to let my tea cool before drinking it so I don't burn my tongue.
  • To make cooler, less warm.
  • * Bible, Luke xvi. 24:
  • Send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water, and cool my tongue.
  • (figuratively) To become less intense, e.g. less amicable or passionate.
  • Relations cooled between the USA and the USSR after 1980.
  • To make less intense, e.g. less amicable or passionate.
  • * Shakespeare:
  • We have reason to cool our raging motions, our carnal stings, our unbitted lusts.
    Derived terms
    * coolant * cooler * cooling * cool off * cool down * cool it * cool one's heels * cool one's jets

    Anagrams

    * * 1000 English basic words ----

    neat

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) nete, neat, from (etyl) . More at (l).

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • (archaic) A bull or cow.
  • * 1663 ,
  • Sturdy he was, and no less able / Than Hercules to cleanse a stable; / As great a drover, and as great / A critic too, in hog or neat .
  • * Shakespeare
  • The steer, the heifer, and the calf / Are all called neat .
  • * Tusser
  • a neat and a sheep of his own.
  • (archaic) Cattle collectively.
  • * 1596 , (Edmund Spenser), The Faerie Queene , VI.9:
  • From thence into the open fields he fled, / Whereas the Heardes were keeping of their neat
    Derived terms
    * neatherd * neatfoot, neatsfoot

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) . See (l).

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Clean, tidy; free from dirt or impurities.
  • :
  • *
  • *:Then his sallow face brightened, for the hall had been carefully furnished, and was very clean. ¶ There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger's weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock-paper on the walls.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=Foreword citation , passage=A very neat old woman, still in her good outdoor coat and best beehive hat, was sitting at a polished mahogany table on whose surface there were several scored scratches so deep that a triangular piece of the veneer had come cleanly away,
  • Free from contaminants; unadulterated, undiluted. Particularly of liquor and cocktails; see usage below.
  • :
  • (lb) Conditions with a liquid reagent or gas performed with no standard solvent or cosolvent.
  • :
  • (lb) With all deductions or allowances made; net.
  • Having a simple elegance or style; clean, trim, tidy, tasteful.
  • :
  • Well-executed or delivered; clever, skillful, precise.
  • :
  • (lb) Good, excellent, desirable.
  • :
  • *{{quote-news, year=2011, date=June 20, author=Phil Mickelson (being quoted), work=BBC News
  • , title= US Open: Jack Nicklaus tips Rory McIlroy for greatness , passage="You can tell that Rory has had this type of talent in him for some time now, and to see him putting it together is pretty neat to see."}}
    Coordinate terms
    * (undiluted liquor or cocktail) straight up, up, straight
    Antonyms
    * (undiluted liquor or cocktail) on the rocks
    Usage notes
    In bartending, neat' has the formal meaning “a liquor pour straight from the bottle into a glass, at room temperature, without ice or chilling”. This is contrasted with , and with drinks that are chilled but strained (stirred over ice to chill, but poured through a strainer so that there is no ice in the glass), which is formally referred to as up. However, the terminology is a point of significant confusion, with ' neat , up, straight up, and straight being used by bar patrons (and some bartenders) variously and ambiguously to mean either “unchilled” or “chilled” (but without ice in the glass), and hence clarification is often required.Up, Neat, Straight Up, or On the Rocks”, Jeffrey Morgenthaler, Friday, May 9th, 2008Walkart, C.G. (2002). National Bartending Center Instruction Manual. Oceanside, California: Bartenders America, Inc. p. 106

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An artificial intelligence researcher who believes that solutions should be elegant, clear and provably correct. Compare scruffy.
  • References

    Anagrams

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