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Mind vs Nature - What's the difference?

mind | nature |

In obsolete terms the difference between mind and nature

is that mind is to put in mind; to remind while nature is to endow with natural qualities.

As nouns the difference between mind and nature

is that mind is the ability for rational thought while nature is the natural world; consisting of all things unaffected by or predating human technology, production and design. e.g. the ecosystem, the natural environment, virgin ground, unmodified species, laws of nature.

As verbs the difference between mind and nature

is that mind is to remember while nature is to endow with natural qualities.

As a proper noun Nature is

the sum of natural forces reified and considered as a sentient being, will, or principle.

mind

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • The ability for rational thought.
  • :
  • The ability to be aware of things.
  • :
  • The ability to remember things.
  • :
  • The ability to focus the thoughts.
  • :
  • Somebody that embodies certain mental qualities.
  • :
  • Judgment, opinion, or view.
  • :
  • Desire, inclination, or intention.
  • :
  • A healthy mental state.
  • :
  • :
  • *
  • *:“[…] it is not fair of you to bring against mankind double weapons ! Dangerous enough you are as woman alone, without bringing to your aid those gifts of mind suited to problems which men have been accustomed to arrogate to themselves.”
  • (lb) The non-material substance or set of processes in which consciousness, perception, affectivity, judgement, thinking, and will are based.
  • :
  • *1699 , , Heads designed for an essay on conversations
  • *:Study gives strength to the mind ; conversation, grace: the first apt to give stiffness, the other suppleness: one gives substance and form to the statue, the other polishes it.
  • *1854 , Samuel Knaggs, Unsoundness of Mind Considered in Relation to the Question of Responsibility for Criminal Acts , p.19:
  • *:The mind is that part of our being which thinks and wills, remembers and reasons; we know nothing of it except from these functions.
  • *1883 , (Howard Pyle), (The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood)
  • *:Thus they dwelled for nearly a year, and in that time Robin Hood often turned over in his mind many means of making an even score with the Sheriff.
  • *, chapter=7
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=

    Synonyms

    * (ability for rational thought) brain, head, intellect, intelligence, nous, psyche, reason, wit * (ability to be aware of things) awareness, consciousness, sentience * (ability to remember things) memory, recollection * (ability to focus the thoughts) attention, concentration, focus * (somebody that embodies certain mental qualities) genius, intellectual, thinker * judgment, judgement, idea, opinion, view * desire, disposition, idea, inclination, intention, mood * (healthy mental state) sanity * (process of ): cognition, learning

    Derived terms

    * aftermind * amind * bear in mind * be of one mind * blow someone's mind * breadth of mind * change one's mind * come to mind * foremind * give someone a piece of one's mind * have a mind like a sieve * have a mind of one's own * have in mind * hivemind * in one's right mind * Jedi mind tricks * know one's own mind * lose one's mind * make up one's mind * meeting of the minds * mind's ear * mind's eye * mind-blowing * mindboggling * mindful * mindless * month's mind * of one mind * of two minds * out of one's mind * overmind * philosophy of mind * presence of mind * put someone in mind of * read someone's mind * right-minded * spring to mind * to my mind * top of mind * undermind * year's mind

    See also

    * (wikipedia)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (now, regional) To remember.
  • * 1896 , , (A Shropshire Lad), XXXVII, lines 25-26:
  • The land where I shall mind you not / Is the land where all's forgot.
  • You should mind your own business.
  • * Addison
  • bidding him be a good child, and mind his book
  • (originally and chiefly in negative or interrogative constructions) To dislike, to object to; to be bothered by.
  • I wouldn't mind an ice cream right now.
  • (now, chiefly, North America, Ireland) To pay attention to; to listen attentively to, to obey.
  • * 2000 , (George RR Martin), A Storm of Swords , Bantam 2011, page 84:
  • ‘Should you ever have a son, Sansa, beat him frequently so he learns to mind you.’
  • To pay attention to (something); to keep one's mind on.
  • * Shakespeare
  • My lord, you nod: you do not mind the play.
  • To look after, to take care of, especially for a short period of time.
  • Would you mind my bag for me?
  • (chiefly, in the imperative) To make sure, to take care ((that)).
  • Mind you don't knock that glass over.
  • To be careful about.
  • * 2005 , Gillie Bolton, Reflective Practice: Writing And Professional Development , ISBN 9781848602120, page xv:
  • Bank Underground Station, London, is built on a curve, leaving a potentially dangerous gap between platform and carriage to trap the unwary. The loudspeaker voice instructs passengers to "Mind the gap": the boundary between train and platform.
  • (obsolete) To have in mind; to intend.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I mind to tell him plainly what I think.
    (Beaconsfield)
  • (obsolete) To put in mind; to remind.
  • * Fuller
  • He minded them of the mutability of all earthly things.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I do thee wrong to mind thee of it.

    Derived terms

    * mind one's p's and q's * mind the store

    Statistics

    * 1000 English basic words ----

    nature

    English

    Alternative forms

    * natuer (obsolete)

    Noun

  • (lb) The natural world; consisting of all things unaffected by or predating human technology, production and design. e.g. the ecosystem, the natural environment, virgin ground, unmodified species, laws of nature.
  • * (1800-1859)
  • *:Nature has caprices which art cannot imitate.
  • *1891 , (Oscar Wilde), ''(The Decay of Lying)
  • *:Nature has good intentions, of course, but, as Aristotle once said, she cannot carry them out. When I look at a landscape I cannot help seeing all its defects.
  • The innate characteristics of a thing. What something will tend by its own constitution, to be or do. Distinct from what might be expected or intended.
  • *1920 , (Herman Cyril McNeile), , Ch.1:
  • *:Being by nature of a cheerful disposition, the symptom did not surprise his servant, late private of the same famous regiment, who was laying breakfast in an adjoining room.
  • *1869 , , :
  • *:Mark hardly knew whether to believe this or not. He already began to suspect that Roswell was something of a humbug, and though it was not in his nature to form a causeless dislike, he certainly did not feel disposed to like Roswell.
  • The summary of everything that has to do with biological, chemical and physical states and events in the physical universe.
  • *(John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • *:I oft admire / How Nature , wise and frugal, could commit / Such disproportions.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2012-01, author=Robert M. Pringle, volume=100, issue=1, page=31
  • , magazine=(American Scientist) , title= How to Be Manipulative , passage=As in much of biology, the most satisfying truths in ecology derive from manipulative experimentation. Tinker with nature and quantify how it responds.}}
  • Conformity to that which is natural, as distinguished from that which is artificial, or forced, or remote from actual experience.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.
  • Kind, sort; character; quality.
  • *(John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • *:A dispute of this nature caused mischief.
  • *
  • *:Carried somehow, somewhither, for some reason, on these surging floods, were these travelers, of errand not wholly obvious to their fellows, yet of such sort as to call into query alike the nature of their errand and their own relations.
  • (lb) Physical constitution or existence; the vital powers; the natural life.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:my days of nature
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:Oppressed nature sleeps.
  • (lb) Natural affection or reverence.
  • *(Alexander Pope) (1688-1744)
  • *:Have we not seen / The murdering son ascend his parent's bed, / Through violated nature force his way?
  • Derived terms

    * animal nature * back to nature * bad nature * by nature * call of nature * defy the laws of nature * crime against nature * freak of nature * good nature * human nature * law of nature/laws of nature * let nature take its course * Mother Nature * nature morte * nature preserve * nature reserve * nature strip * nature study * nature worship * second nature (nature)

    Verb

    (natur)
  • (obsolete) To endow with natural qualities.
  • Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * 1000 English basic words ----