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Supernatural vs Mythology - What's the difference?

supernatural | mythology |

In uncountable|lang=en terms the difference between supernatural and mythology

is that supernatural is (uncountable) supernatural beings and events collectively while mythology is (uncountable) the systematic collection and study of myths.

As nouns the difference between supernatural and mythology

is that supernatural is (countable) a supernatural being while mythology is the collection of myths of a people, concerning the origin of the people, history, deities, ancestors and heroes.

As an adjective supernatural

is above nature; that which is beyond or added to nature, often so considered because it is given by a deity or some force beyond that which humans are born with in roman catholic theology, is considered to be a supernatural addition to human nature.

supernatural

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Above nature; that which is beyond or added to nature, often so considered because it is given by a deity or some force beyond that which humans are born with. In Roman Catholic theology, is considered to be a supernatural addition to human nature.
  • Not of the usual; not natural; altered by forces that are not understood fully if at all.
  • The house is haunted by supernatural forces.
  • Neither visible nor measurable.
  • Synonyms

    * extraordinary, paranormal, preternatural, supranatural, unnatural

    Antonyms

    * ordinary * natural

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (countable) A supernatural being.
  • (uncountable) Supernatural beings and events collectively.
  • * 2012 , Blake Morrison, The Guardian , [http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/jul/20/blake-morrison-under-the-witches-spell?INTCMP=SRCH]:
  • Dr Johnson defended Shakespeare's use of the supernatural from the charge of implausibility on the grounds that, "The reality of witchcraft … has in all ages and countries been credited by the common people, and in most by the learned."

    mythology

    Noun

  • The collection of myths of a people, concerning the origin of the people, history, deities, ancestors and heroes.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-08, volume=407, issue=8839, page=55, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Obama goes troll-hunting , passage=The solitary, lumbering trolls of Scandinavian mythology would sometimes be turned to stone by exposure to sunlight. Barack Obama is hoping that several measures announced on June 4th will have a similarly paralysing effect on their modern incarnation, the patent troll.}}
  • (countable, and, uncountable) A similar body of myths concerning an event, person or institution.
  • * 2003 , Peter Utgaard, Remembering & Forgetting Nazism: Education, National Identity, and the Victim Myth in Postwar Austria , Berghahn Books, ISBN 978-1-57181-187-5, page x:
  • This program to distinguish Austria from Germany was important to building a new Austria, but it also indirectly contributed to victim mythology by implying that participation in the Nazi war of conquest was antithetical to Austrian identity.
  • Pervasive elements of a fictional universe that resemble a mythological universe.
  • * 2000 April 28, Caryn James (?), As Scheherazade Was Saying . . .], in The New York Times'', page E31, reproduced in ''The New York Times Television Reviews 2000 , Routledge (2001), ISBN 978-1-57958-060-5, [http://books.google.com/books?id=z0QFKpI6p7AC&pg=PA198&dq=mythology page 198:
  • This tongue-in-cheek episode is especially fun for people who don’t take their “X-Files” mythology seriously.
  • (uncountable) The systematic collection and study of myths.
  • Synonyms

    *

    Derived terms

    * mythological * mythologist

    See also

    * (projectlink) * (projectlink) * (projectlink) * (projectlink) * (projectlink) * (projectlink) * (projectlink)