Muted vs Musted - What's the difference?

muted | musted |


As verbs the difference between muted and musted

is that muted is (mute) while musted is (must).

muted

English

Verb

(head)
  • (mute)

  • mute

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (m), (m), (etyl) (m), from .

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Not having the power of speech; dumb.
  • * Ovid: Metamorphoses , translated by (John Dryden)
  • Thus, while the mute creation downward bend / Their sight, and to their earthly mother tend, / Man looks aloft; and with erected eyes / Beholds his own hereditary skies. / From such rude principles our form began; / And earth was metamorphos'd into Man.
  • Silent; not making a sound.
  • * Milton
  • All the heavenly choir stood mute , / And silence was in heaven.
  • * 1956 , Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins (?, translators), Lion Feuchtwanger (German author), Raquel: The Jewess of Toledo'' (translation of '' ), Messner, page 178:
  • “ The heathens have broken into Thy Temple, and Thou art silent! Esau mocks Thy Children, and Thou remainest mute'! Show thyself, arise, and let Thy Voice resound, Thou '''mutest''' among all the ' mute !”
  • Not uttered; unpronounced; silent; also, produced by complete closure of the mouth organs which interrupt the passage of breath; said of certain letters.
  • Not giving a ringing sound when struck; said of a metal.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete, theatre) An actor who does not speak; a mime performer.
  • * 1668 OF Dramatick Poesie, AN ESSAY. By JOHN DRYDEN Esq; ((John Dryden))
  • As for the poor honest Maid, whom all the Story is built upon, and who ought to be one of the principal Actors in the Play, she is commonly a Mute in it:
  • A person who does not have the power of speech.
  • A hired mourner at a funeral; an undertaker's assistant.
  • *
  • The little box was eventually carried in one hand by the leading mute , while his colleague, with a finger placed on the lid, to prevent it from swaying, walked to one side and a little to the rear.
  • * 1978 , (Lawrence Durrell), Livia'', Faber & Faber 1992 (''Avignon Quintet ), p. 481:
  • Then followed a long silence during which the mute turned to them and said, ‘Of course you'll be wanting an urn, sir?’
  • (music) An object for dulling the sound of an instrument, especially a brass instrument, or damper for pianoforte; a sordine.
  • Verb

    (mut)
  • To silence, to make quiet.
  • To turn off the sound of.
  • Please mute the music while I make a call.
    Derived terms
    * muter

    See also

    * autism * dumb

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) (m), probably a shortened form of (m), ultimately from (etyl).

    Verb

    (mut)
  • (Ben Jonson)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The faeces of a hawk or falcon.
  • (Hudibras)

    Etymology 3

    (etyl) (lena) .

    Verb

    (mut)
  • To cast off; to moult.
  • * Beaumont and Fletcher
  • Have I muted all my feathers?
    ----

    musted

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (must)

  • must

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) . More at .

    Verb

    (head)
  • to do with certainty; (indicates that the speaker is certain that the subject will have executed the predicate)
  • If it has rained all day, it must be very wet outside.
    You picked one of two, and it wasn't the first: it must have been the second.
    The children must be asleep by now.
  • You must arrive in class on time. — the requirement is an imperative
    This door handle must be rotated fully. — the requirement is a directive
    Arise, and go into the city, and it shall be told thee what thou must do. (Bible, Acts 9:6)
    Quotations
    * 1936 , , More Poems , IX, lines 3-6 *: Forth I wander, forth I must , *: And drink of life again. *: Forth I must by hedgerow bowers *: To look at the leaves uncurled * 1937 J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit *: We must away ere break of day *: To seek the pale enchanted gold. * 1968 Fritz Leiber, Swords in the Mist *: Whereupon while one patched or napped, the other must stand guard against inquisitive two- and three-headed dragons and even an occasional monocephalic.
    Usage notes
    * (sense) Compare with weaker auxiliary verb (should), indicating a strong probability of the predicate's execution. * (sense) Compare with weaker auxiliary verb (should), indicating mere intent for the predicate's execution; and stronger auxiliary verb (will), indicating that the negative consequence will be unusually severe. * The past tense of "must" is also "must"; however, this usage is almost always literary (see Fritz Leiber quotation above). The past sense is usually conveyed by (had to). It is possible to use (be bound to) for the past also. For this reason, (have to) and (be bound to) are also used as alternatives to (must) in the present and future. * The principal verb, if easily supplied, may be omitted. In modern usage this is mainly literary (see Housman and Tolkien quotations above). * (term) is unusual in its negation. (term) still expresses a definite certainty or requirement, with the predicate negated. (term), on the other hand, is negated in the usual manner. Compare: :: You must not' read that book. (''It '''is''' necessary that you '''not read that book. ) :: You need not' read that book. (''It '''is not necessary that you read that book. ) * The second person singular no longer adds "-est" (as it did in Old English).
    See also
    *

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Something that is mandatory or required
  • If you'll be out all day, a map is a must .
    Synonyms
    * imperative
    Antonyms
    * no-no

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) must, most, from (etyl) mustum

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The property of being stale or musty
  • Something that exhibits the property of being stale or musty
  • Fruit juice that will ferment or has fermented, usually grapes
  • * Longfellow
  • No fermenting must fills the deep vats.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make musty.
  • To become musty.
  • Etymology 3

    (etyl) .

    Noun

  • A time during which male elephants exhibit increased levels of sexual activity and aggressiveness (also musth)
  • * 1936 , George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant'' essay in magazine ''New Writing
  • It was not, of course, a wild elephant, but a tame one which had gone ‘must’.

    Statistics

    *