Mush vs Pulp - What's the difference?

mush | pulp |


As nouns the difference between mush and pulp

is that mush is (uncountable) a mess, often of food; a soft or semisolid substance or mush can be (quebecois english|slang) magic mushrooms or mush can be a food comprising cracked or rolled grains cooked in water or milk; porridge or mush can be a walk, especially across the snow with dogs or mush can be (british|primarily southern england|slang) a form of address to a man while pulp is a soft, moist, shapeless mass or matter.

As verbs the difference between mush and pulp

is that mush is to squish so as to break into smaller pieces or to combine with something else or mush can be to walk, especially across the snow with dogs or mush can be to notch, cut, or indent (cloth, etc) with a stamp while pulp is to make, or be made into pulp .

As an interjection mush

is a directive given (usually to dogs or a horse) to start moving, or to move faster.

As an adjective pulp is

(fiction) of or pertaining to pulp magazines; in the style of a pulp magazine or the material printed within such a publication.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

mush

English

Etymology 1

Probably a variant of mash, or from a dialectal variant of (etyl) mos . See also .

Noun

(mushes)
  • (uncountable) A mess, often of food; a soft or semisolid substance.
  • Mom said to add the potatoes to the mush .

    Verb

  • To squish so as to break into smaller pieces or to combine with something else.
  • He mushed the ingredients together.

    Derived terms

    * apple-mush * mushy

    See also

    * mash * moosh

    Etymology 2

    Simple contraction of mushroom.

    Noun

    (mushes)
  • (Quebecois English, slang) magic mushrooms
  • Synonyms
    * shroom (slang)

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) muos and (etyl) , or any thick preparation of fruit.

    Noun

    (-)
  • A food comprising cracked or rolled grains cooked in water or milk; porridge.
  • (rural USA) cornmeal cooked in water and served as a porridge or as a thick sidedish like grits or mashed potatoes.
  • Etymology 4

    Believed to be a contraction of mush on, in turn a corruption of (etyl) , the cry of the voyageurs and coureurs de bois to their dogs.

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • A directive given (usually to dogs or a horse) to start moving, or to move faster.
  • When the lone cowboy saw the Indians, he yelled mush , cha, giddyup!

    Noun

    (mushes)
  • A walk, especially across the snow with dogs.
  • Verb

  • To walk, especially across the snow with dogs.
  • To drive dogs, usually pulling a sled, across the snow.
  • * 1910 , Jack London,
  • Together the two men loaded and lashed the sled. They warmed their hands for the last time, pulled on their mittens, and mushed the dogs over the bank and down to the river-trail.

    Etymology 5

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (mushes)
  • (British, primarily Southern England, slang) A form of address to a man.
  • :* "'Oy, mush ! Get out of it!'
    That's what we'd say
    Barging the locals
    Out of the way"
    MAUREEN AND DOREEN AND NOREEN AND ME'', ''Peculiar Poems , [http://www.jclamb.com/]
  • :* "When I'm around it's not uncommon for someone to call me and say :'Oy mush , get your bum over here and give us a hand.'" — THE ONCE AND FUTURE KING: In Which King Arthur Uther Pendragon Grants An Interview [http://arthurpendragon.ukonline.co.uk/arthur.html]
  • (British, primarily Northern England, slang) The face
  • :* "My ugly mush finally found its way onto the www, but not in the manner to which I deserved." — [http://owlfarm.pmgr.net/aspen/hst16.htm]
  • :* 2002:"I grew my face fungus to cover up an ugly mush ." — [http://www.maggotdrowning.com/forum/topic.asp?ARCHIVE=true&TOPIC_ID=809]
  • :* "and your bird has an ugly mush " — [http://b3ta.com/board/archive/21323/]
  • Synonyms
    * (form of address to a man) mate (UK), pal (especially US) * (the face) mug

    References

    * Take Our Word for It Issue 101, accessed on 2005-05-09

    Etymology 6

    Compare (etyl) .

    Verb

  • To notch, cut, or indent (cloth, etc.) with a stamp.
  • pulp

    English

    (wikipedia pulp)

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (fiction) Of or pertaining to pulp magazines; in the style of a pulp magazine or the material printed within such a publication.
  • * {{quote-usenet
  • , year = 1997 , monthday = July 22 , author = Eric Gimlin , email = , title = Re: Annual theme '98 , id = 33D504B4.105@swbell.net , url = https://groups.google.com/d/msg/rec.arts.comics.dc.universe/h6fDoLuqLi4/pgvPYWi2DZIJ , group = rec.arts.comics.dc.universe }}
    The Nightwing annual had what felt like a very 'pulp-ish' plot, and the Superman annual was great, with a very pulp plot and a incredible Doc Savage tribute cover.
  • * {{quote-usenet
  • , year = 2003 , monthday = January 3 , author = Mark Wheatley , email = , title = Re: PULP 2003 READING , id = 3E159FC7.70409@insightstudiosgroup.com , url = https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.pulp/lPi5SkZJfHo/KeinLoXh5_4J , group = alt.pulp }}
    Rather than Asimov I might suggest Stanley Weinbaum (since he died young and early in his career, he is far more "pulp " than Asimov - and remarkably readable - there is a LANCER collection of some of his short stories).

    Synonyms

    * (l), (l)

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • A soft, moist, shapeless mass or matter.
  • A magazine or book containing lurid subject matter]] and being characteristically [[print, printed on rough, unfinished paper.
  • The soft center of a fruit
  • The soft center of a tooth
  • A mixture of wood, cellulose and/or rags and water ground up to make paper.
  • Mass of chemically processed wood fibres (cellulose).
  • Derived terms

    * beat to a pulp * pulp chamber * pulpaceous * pulpal * pulpament * pulpectomy * pulpify * pulpily * pulpless * pulp mill * pulpous * pulpotomy * pulpwood * pulpy

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make, or be made into pulp
  • To beat to a pulp.
  • Derived terms

    * pulper