Muscle vs Bower - What's the difference?

muscle | bower |


As nouns the difference between muscle and bower

is that muscle is (uncountable) a contractile form of tissue which animals use to effect movement while bower is a bedroom or private apartments, especially for a woman in a medieval castle or bower can be a peasant; a farmer or bower can be either of the two highest trumps in euchre or bower can be (nautical) a type of ship's anchor, carried at the bow or bower can be (obsolete|falconry) a young hawk, when it begins to leave the nest.

As verbs the difference between muscle and bower

is that muscle is to use force to make progress, especially physical force while bower is to embower; to enclose.

muscle

English

(wikipedia muscle)

Alternative forms

* (l)

Noun

(en noun)
  • (uncountable) A contractile form of tissue which animals use to effect movement.
  • Muscle consists largely of actin and myosin filaments.
  • (countable) An organ composed of muscle tissue.
  • *
  • His brow and hair and the palms of his hands were wet, and there was a kind of nervous contraction of his muscles . They seemed to ripple and string tense.
  • *
  • You, Boxer, the very day that those great muscles of yours lose their power, Jones will sell you to the knacker
  • (uncountable, usually plural) A well-developed physique, in which the muscles are enlarged from exercise.
  • * 2008 , Lou Schuler, "Foreward", in'' Nate Green, ''Built for Show , page xii
  • The fact that I was middle-aged, bald, married, and raising girls instead of chasing them didn't really bother me. Muscles are cool at any age.
  • (uncountable, figurative) Strength, force.
  • * 2010 , Adam Quinn, US Foreign Policy in Context , page 81
  • The lesson to be drawn from the events of 1914, to Roosevelt's mind, was that civilization needed muscle to defend it, not just solemn words.
  • * 2013 , John D. MacDonald, The Long Lavender Look , page 15
  • It was going to take muscle to pluck Miss Agnes out of the canal.
  • (uncountable, figurative) Hired strongmen or bodyguards.
  • * 1985 — , The Infinity Doctors , p 34
  • It was easy enough to dodge him, let him crash into the floorboards. Peltroc knew that his priority was the leader, not the hired muscle .

    Derived terms

    * beer muscles * cardiac muscle * gym muscles * involuntary muscle * make a muscle * * musclebound * muscle boy * muscle car * muscled * muscledom * muscle dysmorphia * muscleful * muscle in on * muscleless * muscleman * muscle relaxant * muscle shirt * musclesome * muscle tone * muscle up * muscle-up * muscled up * muscular * muscularity * musculature * muscly * skeletal muscle * smooth muscle * voluntary muscle

    See also

    * myology * myotomy

    Verb

    (muscl)
  • To use force to make progress, especially physical force.
  • He muscled his way through the crowd.
  • * 1988', Steve Holman, "Christian Conquers Columbus", '''' ' 47 (6): 28-34.
  • Hensel and Wilson hit a series of leg shots simultaneously as Christian muscles between them with Quinn right on his heels.

    Derived terms

    * outmuscle

    bower

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) ).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A bedroom or private apartments, especially for a woman in a medieval castle.
  • * Gascoigne
  • Give me my lute in bed now as I lie, / And lock the doors of mine unlucky bower .
  • (literary) A dwelling; a picturesque country cottage, especially one that is used as a retreat.
  • (Shenstone)
  • A shady, leafy shelter or recess in a garden or woods.
  • * 1599 ,
  • say that thou overheard'st us,
    And bid her steal into the pleached bower ,
    Where honey-suckles, ripen'd by the sun,
    Forbid the sun to enter;
  • * {{quote-book, year=1907, author=
  • , title=The Dust of Conflict , chapter=1 citation , passage=
  • (ornithology) A large structure made of grass and bright objects, used by the bower bird during courtship displays.
  • Synonyms
    *

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To embower; to enclose.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • (obsolete) To lodge.
  • (Spenser)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) boueer, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A peasant; a farmer.
  • Etymology 3

    From (etyl) Bauer.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Either of the two highest trumps in euchre.
  • Derived terms
    * best bower * left bower * right bower

    Etymology 4

    From the bow of a ship

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (nautical) A type of ship's anchor, carried at the bow.
  • One who bows or bends.
  • A muscle that bends a limb, especially the arm.
  • * Spenser
  • His rawbone arms, whose mighty brawned bowers / Were wont to rive steel plates and helmets hew.

    Etymology 5

    From bough, compare brancher.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete, falconry) A young hawk, when it begins to leave the nest.
  • (Webster 1913)