Plash vs Murmur - What's the difference?

plash | murmur | Related terms |

Plash is a related term of murmur.


As nouns the difference between plash and murmur

is that plash is (uk|dialectal) a small pool of standing water; a puddle or plash can be the branch of a tree partly cut or bent, and bound to, or intertwined with, other branches while murmur is (countable) low or indistinct sounds or speech.

As verbs the difference between plash and murmur

is that plash is to splash or plash can be to cut partly, or to bend and intertwine the branches of while murmur is .

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

plash

English

Etymology 1

.

Noun

(plashes)
  • (UK, dialectal) A small pool of standing water; a puddle.
  • * 1590 , Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene , II.viii:
  • Out of the wound the red bloud flowed fresh, / That vnderneath his feet soone made a purple plesh .
    (Francis Bacon)
  • * Isaac Barrow
  • These shallow plashes .
  • A splash, or the sound made by a splash.
  • * Henry James, The Aspern Papers
  • Presently a gondola passed along the canal with its slow rhythmical plash , and as we listened we watched it in silence.

    Verb

  • To splash.
  • * Keats
  • plashing among bedded pebbles
  • * Longfellow
  • Far below him plashed the waters.
  • *
  • To cause a splash.
  • To splash or sprinkle with colouring matter.
  • to plash a wall in imitation of granite

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) plaissier, . Compare pleach.

    Noun

    (plashes)
  • The branch of a tree partly cut or bent, and bound to, or intertwined with, other branches.
  • Verb

  • To cut partly, or to bend and intertwine the branches of.
  • * to plash a hedge
  • (Evelyn)

    Anagrams

    *

    murmur

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (countable) Low or indistinct sounds or speech.
  • * 1874 , (Marcus Clarke), (For the Term of His Natural Life) , chapter V:
  • In the prison of the 'tween decks reigned a darkness pregnant with murmurs . The sentry at the entrance to the hatchway was supposed to "prevent the prisoners from making a noise," but he put a very liberal interpretation upon the clause, and so long as the prisoners refrained from shouting, yelling, and fighting--eccentricities in which they sometimes indulged--he did not disturb them.
    A murmur arose from the audience.
  • * 1960 , , (Jeeves in the Offing) , chapter XI:
  • The moment had come for the honeyed word. I lowered my voice to a confidential murmur , but on her inquiring if I had laryngitis raised it again.
  • (medicine) The sound made by any condition which produces noisy, or turbulent, flow of blood through the heart.
  • A muttered complaint or protest; the expression of dissatisfaction in a low muttering voice; any expression of complaint or discontent
  • * 1919 , :
  • In fear of disease and in the interest of his health man will be muzzled and masked like a vicious dog, and that without any murmur of complaint.
  • * 1960 , , (Jeeves in the Offing) , chapter XX:
  • Glossop will return from his afternoon off to find the awful majesty of the Law waiting for him, complete with handcuffs. We can hardly expect him to accept an exemplary sentence without a murmur , so his first move will be to establish his innocence by revealing all.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • * 1526 , (William Tyndale), trans. Bible , (w) VI:
  • The iewes murmured att itt, because he sayde: I am thatt breed which is come doune from heven.
  • (label) To speak or make low, indistinguishable noise; to mumble, mutter.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1922, author=(Ben Travers)
  • , chapter=7, title= A Cuckoo in the Nest , passage=“Oh yes,” he murmured in a tone of obligatory surprise, as he proceeded to make the kind of 2 which he attributed to Margaret's style of chirography.}}
  • (label) To say (something) indistinctly, to mutter.
  • * (William Shakespeare), 1 , II. 3.51
  • Iheard thee murmur tales of iron wars.

    Derived terms

    * murmuration * murmurer * murmuring * murmurless * murmurous

    Synonyms

    * See aslo