Mored vs Mured - What's the difference?

mored | mured |


As verbs the difference between mored and mured

is that mored is (more) while mured is (mure).

mored

English

Verb

(head)
  • (more)

  • more

    English

    (wikipedia more)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) more, from (etyl) .

    Determiner

    (en determiner)
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2014-06-14, volume=411, issue=8891, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= It's a gas , passage=One of the hidden glories of Victorian engineering is proper drains. Isolating a city’s effluent and shipping it away in underground sewers has probably saved more lives than any medical procedure except vaccination.}}
  • (senseid)
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-29, volume=407, issue=8842, page=72-3, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= A punch in the gut , passage=Mostly, the microbiome is beneficial. It helps with digestion and enables people to extract a lot more calories from their food than would otherwise be possible. Research over the past few years, however, has implicated it in diseases from atherosclerosis to asthma to autism.}}

    Adverb

    (-)
  • To a greater degree or extent.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-19, author= Ian Sample
  • , volume=189, issue=6, page=34, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Irregular bedtimes may affect children's brains , passage=Irregular bedtimes may disrupt healthy brain development in young children, according to a study of intelligence and sleeping habits.  ¶ Going to bed at a different time each night affected girls more than boys, but both fared worse on mental tasks than children who had a set bedtime, researchers found.}}
  • * , Bk.XV, Ch.II:
  • Than was there pees betwyxte thys erle and thys Aguaurs, and grete surete that the erle sholde never warre agaynste hym more .
  • (senseid) Used alone to form the comparative form of adjectives and adverbs.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=5 , passage=Then we relapsed into a discomfited silence, and wished we were anywhere else. But Miss Thorn relieved the situation by laughing aloud, and with such a hearty enjoyment that instead of getting angry and more mortified we began to laugh ourselves, and instantly felt better.}}
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=July-August, author=(Henry Petroski)
  • , title= Geothermal Energy , volume=101, issue=4, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Ancient nomads, wishing to ward off the evening chill and enjoy a meal around a campfire, had to collect wood and then spend time and effort coaxing the heat of friction out from between sticks to kindle a flame. With more settled people, animals were harnessed to capstans or caged in treadmills to turn grist into meal.}}
  • Derived terms
    * more or less * more so * less is more

    See also

    * most

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) more, ). More at (l).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) a carrot; a parsnip.
  • (dialectal) a root; stock.
  • A plant.
  • Etymology 3

    From (etyl) moren, from the noun. See above.

    Verb

    (mor)
  • To root up.
  • Statistics

    *

    mured

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (mure)

  • mure

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) wall
  • (Shakespeare)
    No, no; he cannot long hold out these pangs.
    Th' incessant care and labour of his mind
    Hath wrought the mure that should confine it in
  • :— Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part II, [IV, 4], line 2870
  • (obsolete) husks of fruit from which the juice has been squeezed. Perhaps an old spelling of myrrh
  • References

    * Meaning "Husks of fruit": 1949', John Dover Wilson (compiler), ' Life in Shakespeare's England. A Book of Elizabethan Prose , Cambridge at the University Press. 1st ed. 1911, 2nd ed. 1913, 8th reprint. In Glossary and Notes. From Wright's Dialect Dict.

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (obsolete) mural (as a postmodifier)
  • Verb

  • (obsolete) to wall in or fortify
  • (obsolete) To enclose or imprison within walls.
  • (Spenser)
    The five kings are mured in a cave. — John. x. (Heading).

    Anagrams

    * ----