Poop vs Mozart - What's the difference?

poop | mozart |


As nouns the difference between poop and mozart

is that poop is the stern of a ship or poop can be (often|childish) excrement or poop can be a set of data or general information, written or spoken, usually concerning machinery or a process or poop can be a slothful person while mozart is by analogy with , a musical virtuoso.

As a verb poop

is to break seawater with the poop of a vessel, especially the poop deck or poop can be (obsolete|intransitive) to make a short blast on a horn or poop can be to tire, exhaust often used with out .

As a proper noun mozart is

.

poop

English

Etymology 1

Recorded since circa 1405, from (etyl) poupe, from (etyl) poppa, from (etyl) puppis, all meaning "stern of a ship".

Noun

  • The stern of a ship.
  • * (seeCites)
  • Derived terms
    * poop deck
    Synonyms
    * stern
    Antonyms
    * bow

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To break seawater with the poop of a vessel, especially the poop deck.
  • * We were pooped within hailing of the quay and were nearly sunk.
  • To embark a ship over the stern.
  • Etymology 2

    Origin uncertain, possibly from (etyl) poupen.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To make a short blast on a horn
  • (obsolete) To break wind.
  • To defecate.
  • His horse pooped right in the middle of the parade.

    Noun

  • (often, childish) Excrement.
  • * The dog took a poop on the grass.
  • The sound of a steam engine's whistle; typically low pitch.
  • 2001 , , Thomas the tank engine collection : a unique collection of stories from the railway series - p. 157 - Egmont Books, Limited, Aug 15, 2001
    Two minutes passed - five - seven- ten. "Poop'! ' Poop !" Everyone knew that whistle, and a mighty cheer went up as the Queen's train glided into the station.
  • (US, dated) information, facts.
  • Synonyms
    * See also
    Derived terms
    * pooper * pooper scooper * poopsicle * YouTube poop

    Etymology 3

    * Recorded in World War II (1941) Army slang poop sheet "up to date information", itself of uncertain origin, perhaps toilet paper referring to etymology 2.

    Noun

    (-)
  • A set of data or general information, written or spoken, usually concerning machinery or a process.
  • * Here’s the info paper with the poop on that carburetor.
  • Etymology 4

    Origin uncertain, perhaps sound imitation.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To tire, exhaust. Often used with out .
  • * I'm pooped from working so hard
  • * He pooped out a few strides from the finish line.
  • Etymology 5

    Origin uncertain, perhaps a shortening of nincompoop.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A slothful person.
  • * Hurry up, you old poop !
  • mozart

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • By analogy with , a musical virtuoso.
  • * Sir William Mitchell, The Place of Minds in the World (1933) p. 142:
  • One child is a Mozart with a flying start, while another foots it, and makes little way; but the course is the same, being set by the object.
  • * Joseph Lane Hancock, Nature Sketches in Temperate America: A Series of Sketches and Popular Account of Insects, Birds,... (1911) p. 103:
  • He is a Mozart in the insect world, sending out his strain upon the evening air.
  • * Henry Ward Beecher, Plymouth Pulpit: Sermons Preached in Plymouth Church, Brooklyn (1875) p. 446:
  • [W]e can understand how a father who is a good musician may have a son who is a Mozart —a genius in music...
  • By extension, a virtuoso in any field.
  • * Ryan A Nerz, Eat This Book: a year of gorging and glory on the competitive eating circuit (2006) p. 67:
  • There is a Mozart of competitive eating who is yet to reveal himself.
  • * Victor H. Mair, The Columbia History of Chinese Literature (2001) p. 296:
  • Li Po is the most musical, most versatile, and most engaging of Chinese poets, a Mozart of words.
  • * Lawrence Grobel, Endangered Species: Writers Talk about Their Craft, Their Visions, Their Lives (2001):
  • Joyce Carol Oates has said, "If there is a Mozart of interviewers, Larry Grobel is that individual."
  • * Kathryn Ann Lindskoog, Surprised by C.S. Lewis, George MacDonald, and Dante: An Array of Original Discoveries (2001) p. 116:
  • In contrast, MacDonald's Gibbie is not only a moral prodigy, but also a Mozart of religious sensibility.
  • * Noel Bertram Gerson, Harriet Beecher Stowe: a biography (1976) p. 86:
  • By the same token, Rembrandt resembled Hawthorne, and the architect who had designed Melrose Abbey was a Mozart among architects.

    Proper noun

    (en proper noun)
  • Specifically , .
  • Derived terms

    * Mozartkugel

    References

    * Duden, Familiennamen: Herkunft und Bedeutung (Kolheim)