Move vs Walk - What's the difference?

move | walk |


As verbs the difference between move and walk

is that move is to change place or posture; to stir; to go, in any manner, from one place or position to another while walk is to move on the feet by alternately setting each foot (or pair or group of feet, in the case of animals with four or more feet) forward, with at least one foot on the ground at all times compare run .

As nouns the difference between move and walk

is that move is the act of moving; a movement while walk is a trip made by walking.

move

English

Alternative forms

* meve * (l) (obsolete) * (l)

Verb

(mov)
  • To change place or posture; to stir; to go, in any manner, from one place or position to another.
  • A ship moves rapidly.
    I was sitting on the sofa for a long time, I was too lazy to move .
  • * 1839 , Denison Olmsted, A Compendium of Astronomy Page 95
  • Secondly, When a body is once in motion it will continue to move forever, unless something stops it. When a ball is struck on the surface of the earth, the friction of the earth and the resistance of the air soon stop its motion.
  • To act; to take action; to stir; to begin to act; as, to move in a matter.
  • to move in a matter
    Come on guys, let's move : there's work to do!
  • (senseid)To change residence; to remove, as from one house, town, or state, to another; to go and live at another place. See also move out and move in.
  • I decided to move to the country for a more peaceful life.
    They moved closer to work to cut down commuting time.
  • (intransitive, chess, and other games) To change the place of a piece in accordance with the rules of the game.
  • The rook moved from a8 to a6.
    My opponent's counter was moving much quicker round the board than mine.
  • (ergative) To cause to change place or posture in any manner; to set in motion; to carry, convey, draw, or push from one place to another; to impel; to stir.
  • The waves moved the boat up and down.
    The horse moves a carriage.
  • (chess) To transfer (a piece or man) from one space or position to another, according to the rules of the game; as, to move a king.
  • She moved the queen closer to the centre of the board.
  • To excite to action by the presentation of motives; to rouse by representation, persuasion, or appeal; to influence.
  • This song moves me to dance.
  • * Knolles
  • Minds desirous of revenge were not moved with gold.
  • * Dryden
  • No female arts his mind could move .
  • To arouse the feelings or passions of; especially, to excite to tenderness or compassion, to excite, as an emotion.
  • That book really moved me.
  • * Bible, Matthew ix. 36
  • When he saw the multitudes, he was moved with compassion on them.
  • To propose; to recommend; specifically, to propose formally for consideration and determination, in a deliberative assembly; to submit, as a resolution to be adopted; as, to move to adjourn.
  • I move to repeal the rule regarding obligatory school uniform.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Let me but move one question to your daughter.
  • * Hayward
  • They are to be blamed alike who move and who decline war upon particular respects.
  • (obsolete) To mention; to raise (a question); to suggest (a course of action); to lodge (a complaint).
  • (obsolete) To incite, urge (someone to do something); to solicit (someone for or of an issue); to make a proposal to.
  • * 1485 , Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur , Book VII:
  • "Sir," seyde Sir Boys, "ye nede nat to meve me of such maters, for well ye wote I woll do what I may to please you."
  • (obsolete) To apply to, as for aid.
  • (Shakespeare)

    Synonyms

    * actuate * affect * agitate * impel * incite * incline * induce * influence * instigate * offer * persuade * prompt * propose * rouse * stir * transfer * trouble

    Derived terms

    {{der3, move about , move along , move down , move house , move in , move into , move it , move on , move one's arse/move one's ass/move one's bum/move one's butt , move out , move over , move the deckchairs on the Titanic , move the goalposts , move the needle , move up , movable , movability , movableness , movably , movant , moveless , movelessly , movelessness , movement , movent , mover , movie , moving , movingly , movingness , remove}}

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The act of moving; a movement.
  • A slight move of the tiller, and the boat will go off course.
  • An act for the attainment of an object; a step in the execution of a plan or purpose.
  • He made another move towards becoming a naturalized citizen.
  • A formalized or practiced action used in athletics, dance, physical exercise, self-defense, hand-to-hand combat, etc.
  • She always gets spontaneous applause for that one move .
    He can win a match with that one move .
  • The event of changing one's residence.
  • The move into my fiancé's house took two long days.
    They were pleased about their move to the country.
  • A change in strategy.
  • I am worried about our boss's move .
    It was a smart move to bring on a tall striker to play against the smaller defenders.
  • A transfer, a change from one employer to another.
  • * 2013 , Phil McNulty, "[http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/football/23830980]", BBC Sport , 1 September 2013:
  • Robin van Persie squandered United's best chance late on but otherwise it was a relatively comfortable afternoon for Liverpool's new goalkeeper Simon Mignolet, who has yet to concede a Premier League goal since his £9m summer move from Sunderland.
  • (board games) The act of moving a token on a gameboard from one position to another according to the rules of the game.
  • The best move of the game was when he sacrificed his rook in order to gain better possession.
    It's your move ! Roll the dice!
    If you roll a six, you can make two moves .

    Synonyms

    * (act of moving) * (moving to another place) removal, relocation

    Derived terms

    * camera move * get a move on * make a move * on the move

    References

    *

    walk

    English

    (walk)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (lb) To move on the feet by alternately setting each foot (or pair or group of feet, in the case of animals with four or more feet) forward, with at least one foot on the ground at all times. Compare .
  • :
  • *
  • *:Athelstan Arundel walked home all the way, foaming and raging.His mother lived at Pembridge Square, which is four good measured miles from Lincoln's Inn. He walked the whole way, walking through crowds, and under the noses of dray-horses, carriage-horses, and cart-horses, without taking the least notice of them.
  • *, chapter=15
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Edward Churchill still attended to his work in a hopeless mechanical manner like a sleep-walker who walks safely on a well-known round. But his Roman collar galled him, his cossack stifled him, his biretta was as uncomfortable as a merry-andrew's cap and bells.}}
  • To "walk free", i.e. to win, or avoid, a criminal court case, particularly when actually guilty.
  • :
  • Of an object, to be stolen.
  • :
  • To walk off the field, as if given out, after the fielding side appeals and before the umpire has ruled; done as a matter of sportsmanship when the batsman believes he is out.
  • (lb) To travel (a distance) by walking.
  • :
  • *
  • *:Athelstan Arundel walked' home all the way, foaming and raging.His mother lived at Pembridge Square, which is four good measured miles from Lincoln's Inn. He ' walked the whole way, walking through crowds, and under the noses of dray-horses, carriage-horses, and cart-horses, without taking the least notice of them.
  • (lb) To take for a walk or accompany on a walk.
  • :
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:I will rather trusta thief to walk my ambling gelding.
  • To allow a batter to reach base by pitching four balls.
  • (lb) To move something by shifting between two positions, as if it were walking.
  • :
  • (lb) To full; to beat cloth to give it the consistency of felt.
  • (lb) To traverse by walking (or analogous gradual movement).
  • :
  • To leave, resign.
  • :
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:He will make their cows and garrans to walk .
  • (lb) To push (a vehicle) alongside oneself as one walks.
  • *1994 , John Forester, Bicycle Transportation: A Handbook for Cycling Transportation Engineers , MIT Press, p.245:
  • *:The county had a successful defense only because the judge kept telling the jury at every chance that the cyclist should have walked his bicycle like a pedestrian.
  • To behave; to pursue a course of life; to conduct oneself.
  • *(Jeremy Taylor) (1613–1677)
  • *:We walk' perversely with God, and he will ' walk crookedly toward us.
  • To be stirring; to be abroad; to go restlessly about; said of things or persons expected to remain quiet, such as a sleeping person, or the spirit of a dead person.
  • *(Hugh Latimer) (c.1485-1555)
  • *:I heard a pen walking in the chimney behind the cloth.
  • (lb) To be in motion; to act; to move.
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:Her tongue did walk in foul reproach.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:I have heard, but not believed, the spirits of the dead / May walk again.
  • *(Ben Jonson) (1572-1637)
  • *:Do you think I'd walk in any plot?
  • Conjugation

    (en-conj-simple)

    Synonyms

    * (move upon two feet) - See also * be acquitted, get off, go free * (be stolen) be/get stolen; (British) be/get nicked, be/get pinched * (beat cloth) full, waulk (obsolete)

    Derived terms

    * walkathon * walker * Walker * walkies * walk away from * walk away with * walk in * walk in circles * walk into * walk it * walk it off * walk like an Egyptian * walk off * walk off with * walk on * walk on the wild side * walk out * walk over * walk through * walkie-talkie * walkman * Walkman * walkover * walk tall * walk the beat * walk the walk

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A trip made by walking.
  • I take a walk every morning
  • A distance walked.
  • It’s a long walk from my house to the library
  • (sports) An Olympic Games track event requiring that the heel of the leading foot touch the ground before the toe of the trailing foot leaves the ground.
  • A manner of walking; a person's style of walking.
  • The Ministry of Silly Walks is underfunded this year
  • A path, sidewalk/pavement or other maintained place on which to walk. Compare trail .
  • (baseball) An award of first base to a batter following four balls being thrown by the pitcher; known in the rules as a "base on balls".
  • The pitcher now has two walks in this inning alone

    Synonyms

    * (trip made by walking) stroll (slow walk), hike (long walk), trek (long walk) * (distance walked) hike (if long), trek (if long) * (manner of walking) gait * (path) footpath, path, (British) pavement, (US) sidewalk

    Derived terms

    * cakewalk * catwalk * farmer's walk * intentional walk * perp walk * race walk * random walk * sidewalk * space walk / spacewalk * sponsored walk * walk in the park * walk in the snow * walk on the wild side * walk policy * whistle walk