Move vs Steal - What's the difference?

move | steal |


As verbs the difference between move and steal

is that move is to change place or posture; to stir; to go, in any manner, from one place or position to another while steal is .

As a noun move

is the act of moving; a movement.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

move

English

Alternative forms

* meve * (l) (obsolete) * (l)

Verb

(mov)
  • To change place or posture; to stir; to go, in any manner, from one place or position to another.
  • A ship moves rapidly.
    I was sitting on the sofa for a long time, I was too lazy to move .
  • * 1839 , Denison Olmsted, A Compendium of Astronomy Page 95
  • Secondly, When a body is once in motion it will continue to move forever, unless something stops it. When a ball is struck on the surface of the earth, the friction of the earth and the resistance of the air soon stop its motion.
  • To act; to take action; to stir; to begin to act; as, to move in a matter.
  • to move in a matter
    Come on guys, let's move : there's work to do!
  • (senseid)To change residence; to remove, as from one house, town, or state, to another; to go and live at another place. See also move out and move in.
  • I decided to move to the country for a more peaceful life.
    They moved closer to work to cut down commuting time.
  • (intransitive, chess, and other games) To change the place of a piece in accordance with the rules of the game.
  • The rook moved from a8 to a6.
    My opponent's counter was moving much quicker round the board than mine.
  • (ergative) To cause to change place or posture in any manner; to set in motion; to carry, convey, draw, or push from one place to another; to impel; to stir.
  • The waves moved the boat up and down.
    The horse moves a carriage.
  • (chess) To transfer (a piece or man) from one space or position to another, according to the rules of the game; as, to move a king.
  • She moved the queen closer to the centre of the board.
  • To excite to action by the presentation of motives; to rouse by representation, persuasion, or appeal; to influence.
  • This song moves me to dance.
  • * Knolles
  • Minds desirous of revenge were not moved with gold.
  • * Dryden
  • No female arts his mind could move .
  • To arouse the feelings or passions of; especially, to excite to tenderness or compassion, to excite, as an emotion.
  • That book really moved me.
  • * Bible, Matthew ix. 36
  • When he saw the multitudes, he was moved with compassion on them.
  • To propose; to recommend; specifically, to propose formally for consideration and determination, in a deliberative assembly; to submit, as a resolution to be adopted; as, to move to adjourn.
  • I move to repeal the rule regarding obligatory school uniform.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Let me but move one question to your daughter.
  • * Hayward
  • They are to be blamed alike who move and who decline war upon particular respects.
  • (obsolete) To mention; to raise (a question); to suggest (a course of action); to lodge (a complaint).
  • (obsolete) To incite, urge (someone to do something); to solicit (someone for or of an issue); to make a proposal to.
  • * 1485 , Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur , Book VII:
  • "Sir," seyde Sir Boys, "ye nede nat to meve me of such maters, for well ye wote I woll do what I may to please you."
  • (obsolete) To apply to, as for aid.
  • (Shakespeare)

    Synonyms

    * actuate * affect * agitate * impel * incite * incline * induce * influence * instigate * offer * persuade * prompt * propose * rouse * stir * transfer * trouble

    Derived terms

    {{der3, move about , move along , move down , move house , move in , move into , move it , move on , move one's arse/move one's ass/move one's bum/move one's butt , move out , move over , move the deckchairs on the Titanic , move the goalposts , move the needle , move up , movable , movability , movableness , movably , movant , moveless , movelessly , movelessness , movement , movent , mover , movie , moving , movingly , movingness , remove}}

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The act of moving; a movement.
  • A slight move of the tiller, and the boat will go off course.
  • An act for the attainment of an object; a step in the execution of a plan or purpose.
  • He made another move towards becoming a naturalized citizen.
  • A formalized or practiced action used in athletics, dance, physical exercise, self-defense, hand-to-hand combat, etc.
  • She always gets spontaneous applause for that one move .
    He can win a match with that one move .
  • The event of changing one's residence.
  • The move into my fiancé's house took two long days.
    They were pleased about their move to the country.
  • A change in strategy.
  • I am worried about our boss's move .
    It was a smart move to bring on a tall striker to play against the smaller defenders.
  • A transfer, a change from one employer to another.
  • * 2013 , Phil McNulty, "[http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/football/23830980]", BBC Sport , 1 September 2013:
  • Robin van Persie squandered United's best chance late on but otherwise it was a relatively comfortable afternoon for Liverpool's new goalkeeper Simon Mignolet, who has yet to concede a Premier League goal since his £9m summer move from Sunderland.
  • (board games) The act of moving a token on a gameboard from one position to another according to the rules of the game.
  • The best move of the game was when he sacrificed his rook in order to gain better possession.
    It's your move ! Roll the dice!
    If you roll a six, you can make two moves .

    Synonyms

    * (act of moving) * (moving to another place) removal, relocation

    Derived terms

    * camera move * get a move on * make a move * on the move

    References

    *

    steal

    English

    Verb

  • (lb) To take illegally, or without the owner's permission, something owned by someone else.
  • :
  • *
  • *
  • *:"I was dragged up at the workhouse school till I was twelve. Then I ran away and sold papers in the streets, and anything else that I could pick up a few coppers by—except steal'. I never did that. I always made up my mind I'd be a big man some day, and—I'm glad I didn't ' steal ."
  • To appropriate without giving credit or acknowledgement.
  • :
  • (lb) To get or effect surreptitiously or artfully.
  • :
  • *(Isaac Watts) (1674-1748)
  • *:Variety of objects has a tendency to steal away the mind from its steady pursuit of any subject.
  • *(Francis Bacon) (1561-1626)
  • *:Always, when thou changest thine opinion or course, profess it plainly,and do not think to steal it.
  • *
  • To acquire at a low price.
  • :
  • (lb) To draw attention unexpectedly in (an entertainment), especially by being the outstanding performer. Usually used in the phrase steal the show.
  • (lb) To move silently or secretly.
  • :
  • *1922 , (Virginia Woolf), (w, Jacob's Room) Ch.1:
  • *:"Did he take his bottle well?" Mrs. Flanders whispered, and Rebecca nodded and went to the cot and turned down the quilt, and Mrs. Flanders bent over and looked anxiously at the baby, asleep, but frowning. The window shook, and Rebecca stole like a cat and wedged it.
  • *{{quote-news, year=2011, date=October 23, author=Phil McNulty, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= Man Utd 1-6 Man City , passage=United's hopes of mounting a serious response suffered a blow within two minutes of the restart when Evans, who had endured a miserable afternoon, lost concentration and allowed Balotelli to steal in behind him. The defender's only reaction was to haul the Italian down, resulting in an inevitable red card.}}
  • To withdraw or convey (oneself) clandestinely.
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:They could insinuate and steal themselves under the same by their humble carriage and submission.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:He will steal himself into a man's favour.
  • To advance safely to (another base) during the delivery of a pitch, without the aid of a hit, walk, passed ball, wild pitch, or defensive indifference.
  • To dispossess
  • *{{quote-news, year=2011, date=February 12, author=Les Roopanarine, work=BBC
  • , title= Birmingham 1-0 Stoke , passage=However, until Gardner stole the ball from Dean Whitehead in the centre circle with the half-hour approaching, setting off on a run which culminated with a testing long-range shot - with debutant Obafemi Martins lurking, Begovic gathered at the second time of asking - Stoke looked the more credible contenders to break the deadlock.}}

    Synonyms

    * (to illegally take possession of) flog, (Cockney rhyming slang) half-inch, (slang) knock off, (slang) jack, lift, nick, pinch, pocket, rob, thieve, confiscate, convert * (to secretly move) sneak * See also

    Antonyms

    * (acquire licitly ) receive, purchase, buy, earn * (provide freely ) donate, bestow, grant

    Troponyms

    * shoplift

    See also

    * burglarize * burgle * confiscate * pickpocket * pilfer * steal away

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The act of stealing.
  • A piece of merchandise available at a very attractive price.
  • At this price, this car is a steal .
  • (basketball, ice hockey) A situation in which a defensive player actively takes possession of the ball or puck from the opponent's team.
  • (baseball) A stolen base.
  • (curling) Scoring in an end without the hammer.
  • (computing) A policy in database systems that a database follows which allows a transaction to be written on nonvolatile storage before its commit occurs
  • Synonyms

    * (merchandise available at a very attractive price) bargain

    References