Motivate vs Motive - What's the difference?

motivate | motive | Related terms |

Motive is a related term of motivate.

Motivate is a synonym of motive.


As verbs the difference between motivate and motive

is that motivate is to provide someone with an incentive to do something; to encourage while motive is to prompt or incite by a motive or motives; to move.

As a noun motive is

an incentive to act; a reason for doing something; anything that prompted a choice of action.

As a adjective motive is

causing motion; having power to move, or tending to move; as, a motive argument; motive power.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

motivate

English

Verb

(motivat)
  • To provide someone with an incentive to do something; to encourage.
  • * The weekly staff meeting was meant to motivate employees.
  • To animate; to propel; to cause to take action
  • * He was motivated purely by self-interest.
  • * Steam motivated pumps are used in manufacturing.
  • Antonyms

    * demotivate

    motive

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) An idea or communication that makes one want to act, especially from spiritual sources; a divine prompting.
  • *, III.2.1.ii:
  • *:there's something in a woman beyond all human delight; a magnetic virtue, a charming quality, an occult and powerful motive .
  • An incentive to act in a particular way; a reason or emotion that makes one want to do something; anything that prompts a choice of action.
  • * 1947 , (Malcolm Lowry), Under the Volcano :
  • Many of them at first seemed kind to him, but it turned out their motives were not entirely altruistic.
  • (obsolete, rare) A limb or other bodily organ that can move.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • (legal) Something which causes someone to want to commit a crime; a reason for criminal behaviour.
  • What would his motive be for burning down the cottage?
    No-one could understand why she had hidden the shovel; her motives were obscure at best.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1931, author=
  • , chapter=10/6, title= Death Walks in Eastrepps , passage=“Why should Eldridge commit murder?
  • (architecture, fine arts) A motif.
  • (music) A motif; a theme or subject, especially one that is central to the work or often repeated.
  • If you listen carefully, you can hear the flutes mimicking the cello motive .

    Synonyms

    * (incentive ) motivation * (creative works ) motif

    Verb

  • To prompt or incite by a motive or motives; to move.
  • Synonyms

    * motivate

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Causing motion; having power to move, or tending to move; as, a motive argument; motive power.
  • * 1658 , Sir Thomas Browne, The Garden of Cyrus , Folio Society 2007, p. 195:
  • In the motive parts of animals may be discovered mutuall proportions; not only in those of Quadrupeds, but in the thigh-bone, legge, foot-bone, and claws of Birds.
  • Relating to motion and/or to its cause
  • Synonyms

    * moving * (relating to motion) motional

    Anagrams

    * ----