Fortify vs Mortify - What's the difference?

fortify | mortify |


As verbs the difference between fortify and mortify

is that fortify is to increase the defenses of; to strengthen and secure by military works; to render defensible against an attack by hostile forces while mortify is (obsolete|transitive) to kill.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

fortify

English

Verb

(en-verb)
  • To increase the defenses of; to strengthen and secure by military works; to render defensible against an attack by hostile forces.
  • To impart strength or vigor to.
  • * Sir Walter Scott
  • Pride came to the aid of fancy, and both combined to fortify his resolution.
  • *
  • To increase the effectiveness of, as by additional ingredients.
  • * 1979 , Kiplinger's Personal Finance (volume 33, number 7, July 1979, page 47)
  • Compare the nutrition information label of a regular ready-to-eat fortified cereal with that of a presweetened brand and you'll note that, although the sweetened one's sugar content is higher, the fortification is virtually identical.

    mortify

    English

    Verb

    (en-verb)
  • (obsolete) To kill.
  • (obsolete) To reduce the potency of; to nullify; to deaden, neutralize.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • Quicksilver is mortified with turpentine.
  • * Hakewill
  • He mortified pearls in vinegar.
  • (obsolete) To kill off (living tissue etc.); to make necrotic.
  • *, II.3:
  • *:Servius the Grammarian being troubled with the gowt, found no better meanes to be rid of it, than to apply poison to mortifie his legs.
  • To discipline (one's body, appetites etc.) by suppressing desires; to practise abstinence on.
  • Some people seek sainthood by mortifying the body.
  • * Harte
  • With fasting mortified , worn out with tears.
  • * Prior
  • Mortify thy learned lust.
  • * Bible, Col. iii. 5
  • Mortify , therefore, your members which are upon the earth.
  • (usually, used passively) To embarrass, to humiliate.
  • I was so mortified I could have died right there, instead I fainted, but I swore I'd never let that happen to me again.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=5 , passage=Then we relapsed into a discomfited silence, and wished we were anywhere else. But Miss Thorn relieved the situation by laughing aloud, and with such a hearty enjoyment that instead of getting angry and more mortified we began to laugh ourselves, and instantly felt better.}}
  • (obsolete) To affect with vexation, chagrin, or humiliation; to humble; to depress.
  • * Evelyn
  • the news of the fatal battle of Worcester, which exceedingly mortified our expectations
  • * Addison
  • How often is the ambitious man mortified with the very praises he receives, if they do not rise so high as he thinks they ought!
  • (Scotland, legal, historical) To grant in mortmain
  • * 1876 James Grant, History of the Burgh and Parish Schools of Scotland , Part II, Chapter 14, p.453 ( PDF 2.7 MB):
  • the schoolmasters of Ayr were paid out of the mills mortified by Queen Mary