What is the difference between mortar and crush?

mortar | crush |


As nouns the difference between mortar and crush

is that mortar is {{context|uncountable|lang=en}} a mixture of lime or cement, sand and water used for bonding bricks and stones while crush is a violent collision or compression; a crash; destruction; ruin.

As verbs the difference between mortar and crush

is that mortar is to use mortar or plaster to join two things together while crush is to press or bruise between two hard bodies; to squeeze, so as to destroy the natural shape or integrity of the parts, or to force together into a mass.

mortar

English

Noun

  • (uncountable) A mixture of lime or cement, sand and water used for bonding bricks and stones.
  • (countable, military) A muzzle-loading, indirect fire weapon with a tube length of 10 to 20 calibers and designed to lob shells at very steep trajectories.
  • (countable) A hollow vessel used to pound, crush, rub, grind or mix ingredients with a pestle.
  • Derived terms

    * mortarboard

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To use mortar or plaster to join two things together.
  • To fire a mortar (weapon)
  • See also

    * gun * howitzer ----

    crush

    English

    (wikipedia crush)

    Noun

    (es)
  • A violent collision or compression; a crash; destruction; ruin.
  • * Addison
  • the wreck of matter, and the crush of worlds
  • Violent pressure, as of a moving crowd.
  • Crowd which produces uncomfortable pressure.
  • A crush at a reception.
  • A violent crowding
  • A crowd control barrier
  • A short-lived infatuation or affection for.
  • The human object of infatuation or affection.
  • * 2004 , , Character: Profiles in Presidential Courage
  • It had taken nine years from the evening that first showed up with a pie plate at her mother's door, but his dogged perseverance eventually won him the hand of his boyhood Sunday school crush .
  • A standing stock or cage with movable sides used to restrain livestock for safe handling
  • A party, festive function
  • * 1890 ch 1
  • Two months ago I went to a crush at Lady Brandon's.
  • (Australia) The process of crushing cane to remove the raw sugar, or the season that this process takes place in.
  • Derived terms

    * crush hat * crush room * girl crush * man crush

    Verb

    (es)
  • To press or bruise between two hard bodies; to squeeze, so as to destroy the natural shape or integrity of the parts, or to force together into a mass.
  • to crush grapes
    Ye shall not offer unto the Lord that which is bruised, crushed , broken or cut. --Lev. xxii.
  • To reduce to fine particles by pounding or grinding; to comminute.
  • to crush quartz
  • * 1912 , (Edgar Rice Burroughs), (Tarzan of the Apes), Chapter 1
  • With a wild scream he was upon her, tearing a great piece from her side with his mighty teeth, and striking her viciously upon her head and shoulders with a broken tree limb until her skull was crushed to a jelly.
  • To overwhelm by pressure or weight; to beat or force down, as by an incumbent weight.
  • ''After the corruption scandal, the opposition crushed the ruling party in the elections
  • To oppress or burden grievously.
  • To overcome completely; to subdue totally.
  • The sultan's black guard crushed every resistance bloodily.
  • * Sir Walter Scott
  • speedily overtaking and crushing the rebels
  • To be or become broken down or in, or pressed into a smaller compass, by external weight or force
  • an eggshell crushes easily
  • To feel infatuation with or unrequited love for.
  • She's crushing on him.
  • (sports) to defeat emphatically
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=November 11 , author=Rory Houston , title=Estonia 0-4 Republic of Ireland , work=RTE Sport citation , page= , passage=A stunning performance from the Republic of Ireland all but sealed progress to Euro 2012 as they crushed nine-man Estonia 4-0 in the first leg of the qualifying play-off tie in A Le Coq Arena in Tallinn.}}

    Derived terms

    * crusher * crushing * crush on * crush out * crushed sugar * crushed velvet

    References

    *