Mores vs Moral - What's the difference?

mores | moral |

Mores is a related term of moral.


As nouns the difference between mores and moral

is that mores is a set of moral norms or customs derived from generally accepted practices rather than written laws while moral is (of a narrative) the ethical significance or practical lesson.

As a adjective moral is

of or relating to principles of right and wrong in behaviour, especially for teaching right behaviour.

mores

English

(wikipedia mores)

Alternative forms

* moeurs

Etymology 1

From the (etyl) .

Noun

(en-plural noun)
  • A set of moral norms or customs derived from generally accepted practices rather than written laws.
  • * 1970 , Alvin Toffler, Future Shock , Bantam Books, page 99:
  • All of us seem to need some totalistic relationships in our lives. But to decry the fact that we cannot have only such relationships is nonsense. And to prefer a society in which the individual has holistic relationships with a few, rather than modular relationships with many, is to wish for a return to the imprisonment of the past?—?a past when individuals may have been more tightly bound to one another, but when they were also more tightly regimented by social conventions, sexual mores , political and religious restrictions.
  • * 1973 , (Philippa Foot), “Nietzsche: The Revaluation of Values” in Nietzsche: A Collection of Critical Essays , edited by : , ISBN 0385033443, page 165:
  • It is relevant here to recall that the word “morality” is derived from mos'' with its plural ''mores'', and that in its present usage it has not lost this connexion with the ''mores ?—?the rules of behaviour?—?of a society.

    Etymology 2

    Noun

    (head)
  • Etymology 3

    Verb

    (head)
  • (more)
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    moral

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Of or relating to principles of right and wrong in behaviour, especially for teaching right behaviour.
  • * Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • She had wandered without rule or guidance in a moral wilderness.
  • Conforming to a standard of right behaviour; sanctioned by or operative on one's conscience or ethical judgment.
  • * Sir M. Hale
  • the wiser and more moral part of mankind
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=1 , passage=The stories did not seem to me to touch life. They were plainly intended to have a bracing moral effect, and perhaps had this result for the people at whom they were aimed. They left me with the impression of a well-delivered stereopticon lecture, with characters about as life-like as the shadows on the screen, and whisking on and off, at the mercy of the operator.}}
  • Capable of right and wrong action.
  • Probable but not proved.
  • Positively affecting the mind, confidence, or will.
  • Synonyms

    * (conforming to a standard of right behaviour) ethical, incorruptible, noble, righteous, virtuous * (probable but not proved) virtual

    Antonyms

    * immoral, amoral, non-moral, unmoral

    Derived terms

    * moral compass * moral high ground * moral minimum

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (of a narrative) The ethical significance or practical lesson.
  • The moral of the (The Boy Who Cried Wolf) is that if you repeatedly lie, people won't believe you when you tell the truth.
  • * Macaulay
  • We protest against the principle that the world of pure comedy is one into which no moral enters.
  • Moral practices or teachings: modes of conduct.
  • (obsolete) A morality play.
  • Synonyms

    * (moral practices or teachings) ethics, mores

    Hyponyms

    * golden rule

    Anagrams

    * ----