Poop vs Mop - What's the difference?

poop | mop |


As a noun poop

is the stern of a ship or poop can be (often|childish) excrement or poop can be a set of data or general information, written or spoken, usually concerning machinery or a process or poop can be a slothful person.

As a verb poop

is to break seawater with the poop of a vessel, especially the poop deck or poop can be (obsolete|intransitive) to make a short blast on a horn or poop can be to tire, exhaust often used with out .

As a symbol mop is

macanese pataca.

poop

English

Etymology 1

Recorded since circa 1405, from (etyl) poupe, from (etyl) poppa, from (etyl) puppis, all meaning "stern of a ship".

Noun

  • The stern of a ship.
  • * (seeCites)
  • Derived terms
    * poop deck
    Synonyms
    * stern
    Antonyms
    * bow

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To break seawater with the poop of a vessel, especially the poop deck.
  • * We were pooped within hailing of the quay and were nearly sunk.
  • To embark a ship over the stern.
  • Etymology 2

    Origin uncertain, possibly from (etyl) poupen.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To make a short blast on a horn
  • (obsolete) To break wind.
  • To defecate.
  • His horse pooped right in the middle of the parade.

    Noun

  • (often, childish) Excrement.
  • * The dog took a poop on the grass.
  • The sound of a steam engine's whistle; typically low pitch.
  • 2001 , , Thomas the tank engine collection : a unique collection of stories from the railway series - p. 157 - Egmont Books, Limited, Aug 15, 2001
    Two minutes passed - five - seven- ten. "Poop'! ' Poop !" Everyone knew that whistle, and a mighty cheer went up as the Queen's train glided into the station.
  • (US, dated) information, facts.
  • Synonyms
    * See also
    Derived terms
    * pooper * pooper scooper * poopsicle * YouTube poop

    Etymology 3

    * Recorded in World War II (1941) Army slang poop sheet "up to date information", itself of uncertain origin, perhaps toilet paper referring to etymology 2.

    Noun

    (-)
  • A set of data or general information, written or spoken, usually concerning machinery or a process.
  • * Here’s the info paper with the poop on that carburetor.
  • Etymology 4

    Origin uncertain, perhaps sound imitation.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To tire, exhaust. Often used with out .
  • * I'm pooped from working so hard
  • * He pooped out a few strides from the finish line.
  • Etymology 5

    Origin uncertain, perhaps a shortening of nincompoop.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A slothful person.
  • * Hurry up, you old poop !
  • mop

    English

    Noun

    (en noun) (wikipedia mop)
  • An implement for washing floors, or the like, made of a piece of cloth, or a collection of thrums, or coarse yarn, fastened to a handle.
  • (humorous) A dense head of hair.
  • He ran a comb through his mop and hurried out the door.
  • (British, dialect) A fair where servants are hired.
  • (British, dialect) The young of any animal; also, a young girl; a moppet.
  • (Halliwell)
  • A made-up face; a grimace.
  • * (rfdate) (Francis Beaumont) and
  • What mops and mowes it makes! --
  • * 1610 , , act 4 scene 1
  • Before you can say 'Come' and 'Go,'
    And breathe twice; and cry 'so, so,'
    Each one, tripping on his toe,
    Will be here with mop and mow.

    Derived terms

    * mophead * mop squeezer * mop water

    Descendants

    * German: (l)

    Verb

    (mopp)
  • To rub, scrub, clean or wipe with a mop, or as if with a mop.
  • to mop (or scrub) a floor
    to mop one's face with a handkerchief
  • To make a wry expression with the mouth.
  • (Shakespeare)

    Anagrams

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