Undercurrent vs Mood - What's the difference?

undercurrent | mood | Related terms |

Undercurrent is a related term of mood.


As a noun undercurrent

is a current which flows under the surface.

As an adjective mood is

tired.

undercurrent

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • a current which flows under the surface
  • (Totten)
  • (figuratively) A tendency of feeling or opinion that is concealed rather than exposed.
  • * George Eliot
  • All the while there was a busy undercurrent in her.
  • :The meeting was pervaded with an undercurrent of dread, as the managers tried not to admit firings were looming.
  • *{{quote-news
  • , year=2012 , date=May 9 , author=Jonathan Wilson , title=Europa League: Radamel Falcao's Atlético Madrid rout Athletic Bilbao , work=the Guardian citation , page= , passage=Although the crowd was predominantly red-and-white, there was also a Romanian flavour, which these days in football terms tends to mean there is at least an undercurrent of discontent. }}

    mood

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) mood, mode, mod, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A mental or emotional state, composure.
  • I'm in a sad mood since I dumped my lover.
  • A sullen mental state; a bad mood.
  • He's in a mood with me today.
  • A disposition to do something.
  • I'm not in the mood for running today.
  • (senseid) A prevalent atmosphere or feeling.
  • A good politician senses the mood of the crowd.
    Usage notes
    * Adjectives often used with "mood": good, bad.
    Synonyms
    * (mental or emotional state) composure, humor/humour, spirits, temperament * (bad mood) huff (informal), pet, temper * (disposition to do something) frame of mind
    Antonyms
    * (bad mood) good humour, good mood, good spirits
    Derived terms
    * in the mood * mood music * mood swing * moody
    See also
    * ambiance, ambience * atmosphere *Gemuetlichkeit

    Etymology 2

    Alteration of mode

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (grammar) A verb form that depends on how its containing clause relates to the speaker’s or writer’s wish, intent, or assertion about reality.
  • The most common mood in English is the indicative.
    Synonyms
    * mode * grammatical mood
    Hyponyms
    * See also
    Derived terms
    * indicative mood * conjunctive mood = subjunctive mood * imperative mood * conditional mood
    See also
    * aspect * tense

    Anagrams

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