Mood vs Strop - What's the difference?

mood | strop |


As nouns the difference between mood and strop

is that mood is a mental or emotional state, composure or mood can be (grammar) a verb form that depends on how its containing clause relates to the speaker’s or writer’s wish, intent, or assertion about reality while strop is a strap; more specifically a piece of leather or a substitute (notably canvas), or strip of wood covered with a suitable material, for honing a razor, in this sense also called razor strop .

As a verb strop is

(obsolete) to strap or strop can be (computing) to syntactically mark a sequence of letters as having a special property, such as being a keyword, eg by enclosing in apostrophes as in 'foo' or writing in uppercase as in foo.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

mood

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) mood, mode, mod, from (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A mental or emotional state, composure.
  • I'm in a sad mood since I dumped my lover.
  • A sullen mental state; a bad mood.
  • He's in a mood with me today.
  • A disposition to do something.
  • I'm not in the mood for running today.
  • (senseid) A prevalent atmosphere or feeling.
  • A good politician senses the mood of the crowd.
    Usage notes
    * Adjectives often used with "mood": good, bad.
    Synonyms
    * (mental or emotional state) composure, humor/humour, spirits, temperament * (bad mood) huff (informal), pet, temper * (disposition to do something) frame of mind
    Antonyms
    * (bad mood) good humour, good mood, good spirits
    Derived terms
    * in the mood * mood music * mood swing * moody
    See also
    * ambiance, ambience * atmosphere *Gemuetlichkeit

    Etymology 2

    Alteration of mode

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (grammar) A verb form that depends on how its containing clause relates to the speaker’s or writer’s wish, intent, or assertion about reality.
  • The most common mood in English is the indicative.
    Synonyms
    * mode * grammatical mood
    Hyponyms
    * See also
    Derived terms
    * indicative mood * conjunctive mood = subjunctive mood * imperative mood * conditional mood
    See also
    * aspect * tense

    Anagrams

    * ----

    strop

    English

    Etymology 1

    Same as strap (which see); recorded in English since 1702.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A strap; more specifically a piece of leather or a substitute (notably canvas), or strip of wood covered with a suitable material, for honing a razor, in this sense also called razor strop .
  • (British) A bad mood or temper (see stroppy.)
  • (nautical) A piece of rope spliced into a circular wreath, and put round a block for hanging it.
  • Synonyms
    * huff

    Verb

    (stropp)
  • (obsolete) To strap.
  • (recorded since 1842; now most used ) To hone (a razor) with a strop.
  • One should strop the razor before each shave.

    Etymology 2

    From apostrophe, due to use of apostrophes as single quotation marks to indicate boldface in , where the earlier matched apostrophes were no longer common,''Revised Report on the Algorithmic Language ALGOL 68, p. 123, footnote and the term became used more generally for any such method.

    Verb

    (stropp)
  • (computing) To mark a sequence of letters syntactically as having a special property, such as being a keyword, e.g. by enclosing in apostrophes as in 'foo' or writing in uppercase as in FOO.
  • References

    * Etymology on line

    Anagrams

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