Mood vs Hortative - What's the difference?

mood | hortative |


In context|grammar|lang=en terms the difference between mood and hortative

is that mood is (grammar) a verb form that depends on how its containing clause relates to the speaker’s or writer’s wish, intent, or assertion about reality while hortative is (grammar) a mood or class of imperative subjunctive moods of a verb for giving strong encouragement.

As nouns the difference between mood and hortative

is that mood is a mental or emotional state, composure or mood can be (grammar) a verb form that depends on how its containing clause relates to the speaker’s or writer’s wish, intent, or assertion about reality while hortative is (grammar) a mood or class of imperative subjunctive moods of a verb for giving strong encouragement.

As an adjective hortative is

(comparable) urging, exhorting, or encouraging.

mood

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) mood, mode, mod, from (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A mental or emotional state, composure.
  • I'm in a sad mood since I dumped my lover.
  • A sullen mental state; a bad mood.
  • He's in a mood with me today.
  • A disposition to do something.
  • I'm not in the mood for running today.
  • (senseid) A prevalent atmosphere or feeling.
  • A good politician senses the mood of the crowd.
    Usage notes
    * Adjectives often used with "mood": good, bad.
    Synonyms
    * (mental or emotional state) composure, humor/humour, spirits, temperament * (bad mood) huff (informal), pet, temper * (disposition to do something) frame of mind
    Antonyms
    * (bad mood) good humour, good mood, good spirits
    Derived terms
    * in the mood * mood music * mood swing * moody
    See also
    * ambiance, ambience * atmosphere *Gemuetlichkeit

    Etymology 2

    Alteration of mode

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (grammar) A verb form that depends on how its containing clause relates to the speaker’s or writer’s wish, intent, or assertion about reality.
  • The most common mood in English is the indicative.
    Synonyms
    * mode * grammatical mood
    Hyponyms
    * See also
    Derived terms
    * indicative mood * conjunctive mood = subjunctive mood * imperative mood * conditional mood
    See also
    * aspect * tense

    Anagrams

    * ----

    hortative

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (comparable) Urging, exhorting, or encouraging.
  • * 1854 , "The Preaching Required by the Times" (Editorial), The National Magazine , New York, vol. 4, no. 1 (Jan.), pp. 79-80.
  • The ministration of these oracles from the pulpit is to be reformed from any of its factitious peculiarities, and made again what it was among the apostles and their immediate successors—earnest, simple, powerful address—hortative talk, if we may so call it.
  • (grammar, not comparable) Of a mood or class of imperative subjunctive moods of a verb for giving strong encouragement.
  • Synonyms

    * (giving strong encouragement) hortatory, supportive * (of a mood of a verb) cohortative, exhortative, hortatory

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (grammar) A mood or class of imperative subjunctive moods of a verb for giving strong encouragement.
  • Synonyms

    * (mood of an imperative verb) cohortative, exhortative

    See also

    * jussive