Mood vs Darken - What's the difference?

mood | darken |


As a noun mood

is a mental or emotional state, composure or mood can be (grammar) a verb form that depends on how its containing clause relates to the speaker’s or writer’s wish, intent, or assertion about reality.

As a verb darken is

to make dark or darker by reducing light.

mood

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) mood, mode, mod, from (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A mental or emotional state, composure.
  • I'm in a sad mood since I dumped my lover.
  • A sullen mental state; a bad mood.
  • He's in a mood with me today.
  • A disposition to do something.
  • I'm not in the mood for running today.
  • (senseid) A prevalent atmosphere or feeling.
  • A good politician senses the mood of the crowd.
    Usage notes
    * Adjectives often used with "mood": good, bad.
    Synonyms
    * (mental or emotional state) composure, humor/humour, spirits, temperament * (bad mood) huff (informal), pet, temper * (disposition to do something) frame of mind
    Antonyms
    * (bad mood) good humour, good mood, good spirits
    Derived terms
    * in the mood * mood music * mood swing * moody
    See also
    * ambiance, ambience * atmosphere *Gemuetlichkeit

    Etymology 2

    Alteration of mode

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (grammar) A verb form that depends on how its containing clause relates to the speaker’s or writer’s wish, intent, or assertion about reality.
  • The most common mood in English is the indicative.
    Synonyms
    * mode * grammatical mood
    Hyponyms
    * See also
    Derived terms
    * indicative mood * conjunctive mood = subjunctive mood * imperative mood * conditional mood
    See also
    * aspect * tense

    Anagrams

    * ----

    darken

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make dark or darker by reducing light.
  • * Bible, Exodus x. 15
  • They [locusts] covered the face of the whole earth, so that the land was darkened .
  • To become dark or darker (having less light).
  • To make dark or darker in colour.
  • To become dark or darker in colour.
  • To render gloomy, darker in mood
  • * Shakespeare
  • With these forced thoughts, I prithee, darken not / The mirth of the feast.
  • To become gloomy, darker in mood
  • To blind, impair eyesight
  • * Bible, Rom xi. 10
  • Let their eyes be darkened , that they may not see.
  • To be blinded, loose clear vision
  • To cloud, obscure, or perplex; to render less clear or intelligible.
  • * Bible, Job xxxviii. 2
  • Who is this that darkeneth counsel by words without knowledge?
  • * Francis Bacon
  • Such was his wisdom that his confidence did seldom darken his foresight.
  • To make foul; to sully; to tarnish.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I must not think there are / Evils enough to darken all his goodness.

    Conjugation

    (en-conj-simple)

    Derived terms

    * darkener * darken someone's door

    Synonyms

    * blacken

    Anagrams

    * * * * * English ergative verbs