Model vs Large - What's the difference?

model | large |


As nouns the difference between model and large

is that model is a person who serves as a subject for artwork or fashion, usually in the medium of photography but also for painting or drawing while large is (music|obsolete) an old musical note, equal to two longas, four breves, or eight semibreves.

As adjectives the difference between model and large

is that model is worthy of being a model; exemplary while large is of considerable or relatively great size or extent.

As a verb model

is to display for others to see, especially in regard to wearing clothing while performing the role of a fashion model.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

model

English

(wikipedia model)

Alternative forms

* modell

Noun

(en noun)
  • A person who serves as a subject for artwork or fashion, usually in the medium of photography but also for painting or drawing.
  • A person, usually an attractive female, hired to show items or goods to the public, such as items given away as prizes on a TV game show.
  • A representation of a physical object, usually in miniature.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I had my father's signet in my purse, / Which was the model of that Danish seal.
  • * Addison
  • You have the models of several ancient temples, though the temples and the gods are perished.
  • A simplified representation used to explain the workings of a real world system or event.
  • A style, type, or design.
  • The structural design of a complex system.
  • A successful example to be copied, with or without modifications.
  • He was a model of eloquence and virtue.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-22, volume=407, issue=8841, page=70, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Engineers of a different kind , passage=Private-equity nabobs bristle at being dubbed mere financiers.
  • (logic) An interpretation function which assigns a truth value to each atomic proposition.
  • (logic) An interpretation which makes a certain sentence true, in which case that interpretation is called a model of that sentence.
  • A particular style, design, or make of a particular product.
  • (manufacturing) An identifier of a product given by its manufacturer (also called model number).
  • Any copy, or resemblance, more or less exact.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Thou seest thy wretched brother die, / Who was the model of thy father's life.

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * abstract model * animal model * arbitrage pricing model * business model * causal model * commercial model * computer model * conceptual model * data model * database model * Document Object Model * economy model * enterprise architecture model * entity-relationship model * fashion model * fetish model * fitness model * glamour model * information model * late model * mark to model * mathematical model * mental model * model aircraft * model checking * model organism * model solution * model theory * modelizer * modelly * multimodel * off-model * plamodel * production model * relational model * role model * runway model * scale model * scientific model * spokesmodel * supermodel * waterfall model * water-line model * view model

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Worthy of being a model; exemplary.
  • * (rfdate), Blackwood's Magazine , volume 289, page 525:
  • At our approach the animals made so much noise that the owners of the hut peered round the door to see what was the matter; outwardly rather less model than the farm, there appeared two ancient Basques, emblematically black-bereted, gnarled [...]
  • * 1898 , John Thorburn, The St. Andrew's Society of Ottawa: 1846-1897 : sketch , page 40:
  • [...] from the land of your origin, because you demand the claims of those who believe it more model than yours, [...]
  • * 1932 , Nora Fugger, James Austin Galaston (translator), The Glory of the Habsburgs: the Memoirs of Princess Fugger , page 35:
  • Methods of game-preservation in their extensive and well-stocked hunting-grounds were as model as the huntsmanlike management of the hunts.
  • * 1934 , Charles Ryle Fay, Imperial economy and its place in the formation of economic doctrine, 1600-1932 , page 143:
  • [...] and we press with special severity on one small country whose agriculture is as model as is her way of rural life.
  • * 1956 , Stephen Rynne, All Ireland , page 54:
  • True, it is an untidy county; the farmhouses are much more model' than the farms (when we reach Antrim we shall find that the farms are more ' model than the farmhouses).
  • * 1968 , American County Government , volume 33, page 19:
  • But not all the exchanges were as model as the sergeant. Some of the exchangees showed a rigidity and reluctance to adapt.
  • * 1999 , Michael D. Williams, Acquisition for the 21st century: the F-22 Development Program , page 113:
  • It is as model as you can get.
  • * 2002 , Uma Anand Segal, A framework for immigration: Asians in the United States , page 308:
  • While Asians have been perceived as the model minority, it is increasingly clear that some Asian groups are more model than are others, and even within these model groups, a division exists [...]
  • * 2010 , Eleanor Coppola, Notes on a Life , page 140:
  • All were neat and well kept which added to the sense that they were more model than real.

    Synonyms

    * (worthy of being a model) ideal

    Verb

  • To display for others to see, especially in regard to wearing clothing while performing the role of a fashion model.
  • She modelled the shoes for her friends to see.
  • To use as an object in the creation of a forecast or model.
  • They modelled the data with a computer to analyze the experiment’s results.
  • To make a miniature model of.
  • He takes great pride in his skill at modeling airplanes.
  • To create from a substance such as clay.
  • The sculptor modelled the clay into the form of a dolphin.
  • To make a or models.
  • To be a model of any kind.
  • The actress used to model before being discovered by Hollywood.

    Synonyms

    * modelise, US modelize

    large

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Of considerable or relatively great size or extent.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=2 , passage=We drove back to the office with some concern on my part at the prospect of so large a case. Sunning himself on the board steps, I saw for the first time Mr. Farquhar Fenelon Cooke.}}
  • (obsolete) Abundant; ample.
  • * Milton
  • We have yet large day.
  • (archaic) Full in statement; diffuse; profuse.
  • * Felton
  • I might be very large upon the importance and advantages of education.
  • (obsolete) Free; unencumbered.
  • * Fairfax
  • Of burdens all he set the Paynims large .
  • (obsolete) Unrestrained by decorum; said of language.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Some large jests he will make.
  • (nautical) Crossing the line of a ship's course in a favorable direction; said of the wind when it is abeam, or between the beam and the quarter.
  • Synonyms

    (checksyns) * big, huge, giant, gigantic, enormous, stour, great, mickle, largeish * See also

    Antonyms

    * small, tiny, minuscule

    Derived terms

    * as large as life, larger than life * by and large * enlarge * give it large * have it large * large it, large up, large it up * largely * largeness * writ large * largish

    Noun

  • (music, obsolete) An old musical note, equal to two longas, four breves, or eight semibreves.
  • (obsolete) Liberality, generosity.
  • A thousand dollars.
  • Getting a car tricked out like that will cost you 50 large .

    Derived terms

    * at large

    Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * (l), (l), (l), (l), (l) 1000 English basic words 200 English basic words ----