Roast vs Mock - What's the difference?

roast | mock |


As verbs the difference between roast and mock

is that roast is (transitive|or|intransitive|or|ergative) to cook food by heating in an oven or over a fire without covering, resulting in a crisp, possibly even slightly charred appearance while mock is to mimic, to simulate.

As nouns the difference between roast and mock

is that roast is a cut of meat suited to roasting while mock is an imitation, usually of lesser quality.

As adjectives the difference between roast and mock

is that roast is having been cooked by roasting while mock is imitation, not genuine; fake.

roast

English

Verb

(en verb)
  • (transitive, or, intransitive, or, ergative) To cook food by heating in an oven or over a fire without covering, resulting in a crisp, possibly even slightly charred appearance.
  • to roast meat on a spit
  • To cook by surrounding with hot embers, ashes, sand, etc.
  • to roast a potato in ashes
  • * Francis Bacon
  • In eggs boiled and roasted there is scarce difference to be discerned.
  • (transitive, or, intransitive, or, ergative) To process by drying through exposure to sun or artificial heat
  • Coffee beans need roasting before use.
    to roast chestnuts or peanuts
  • To heat to excess; to heat violently; to burn.
  • * Shakespeare
  • roasted in wrath and fire
  • (figuratively) To admonish someone vigorously
  • I’m late home for the fourth time this week; my mate will really roast me this time.
  • (figuratively) To subject to bantering, severely criticize, sometimes as a comedy routine.
  • The class clown enjoys being roasted by mates as well as staff.
  • (metalworking) To dissipate by heat the volatile parts of, as ores.
  • Coordinate terms

    * (to cook) bake, boil, broil, fry, grill, poach, toast

    Derived terms

    * roasting ear * roasting jack

    Noun

  • (en noun)
  • A cut of meat suited to roasting
  • A meal consisting of roast foods.
  • The degree to which something, especially coffee, is roasted.
  • Dark roast''' means that the coffee bean has been roasted to a higher temperature and for a longer period of time than in light '''roast .
  • (Originally fraternal) A comical event where a person is subjected to verbal attack, yet may be praised by sarcasm and jokes.
  • Derived terms

    * nut roast

    Adjective

    (-)
  • having been cooked by roasting
  • (figuratively) subjected to roasting, bantered, severely criticized
  • See also

    * barbecue * chargrill * grill * joint * roasties

    mock

    English

    Alternative forms

    * (l) (obsolete)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An imitation, usually of lesser quality.
  • (Crashaw)
  • Mockery, the act of mocking.
  • * Bible, Proverbs xiv. 9
  • Fools make a mock at sin.
  • A practice exam set by an educating institution to prepare students for an important exam.
  • He got a B in his History mock , but improved to an A in the exam.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To mimic, to simulate.
  • * Shakespeare
  • To see the life as lively mocked' as ever / Still sleep ' mocked death.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Mocking marriage with a dame of France.
  • To make fun of by mimicking, to taunt.
  • * Bible, 1 Kings xviii. 27
  • Elijah mocked them, and said, Cry aloud.
  • * Gray
  • Let not ambition mock their useful toil.
  • To tantalise, and disappoint (the hopes of).
  • * Bible, Judges xvi. 13
  • Thou hast mocked me, and told me lies.
  • * 1597 , William Shakespeare, Henry IV , Part II, Act V, Scene III:
  • And with his spirit sadly I survive, / to mock the expectations of the world; / to frustrate prophecies, and to raze out / rotten opinion
  • * 1603 , William Shakespeare, Othello , Act III, Scene III:
  • "It is the greene-ey'd Monster, which doth mocke / The meate it feeds on."
  • * 1667 , John Milton, Paradise Lost :
  • Why do I overlive? / Why am I mocked with death, and lengthened out / to deathless pain?
  • * Milton
  • He will not / Mock us with his blest sight, then snatch him hence.
  • * 1765 , Benjamin Heath, A revisal of Shakespear's text , page 563 (a commentary on the "mocke the meate" line from Othello):
  • ‘Mock’ certainly never signifies to loath. Its common signification is, to disappoint.
  • * 1812 , The Critical Review or, Annals of Literature , page 190:
  • The French revolution indeed is a prodigy which has mocked the expectations both of its friends and its foes. It has cruelly disappointed the fondest hopes of the first, nor has it observed that course which the last thought that it would have pursued.

    Synonyms

    * See also * See also

    See also

    * jeer

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Imitation, not genuine; fake.