Sulk vs Moan - What's the difference?

sulk | moan |


As a noun sulk

is a state of sulking or sulk can be a furrow.

As a verb sulk

is to express ill humor or offense by remaining sullenly silent or withdrawn.

As a proper noun moan is

anglesey.

sulk

English

Etymology 1

Noun

(en noun)
  • a state of sulking.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • to express ill humor or offense by remaining sullenly silent or withdrawn.
  • Synonyms
    * mope

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) (lena) sulcus.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A furrow.
  • References

    * * *

    Anagrams

    *

    moan

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • a low, mournful cry of pain, sorrow or pleasure
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • * 1596 , (Edmund Spenser), The Faerie Queene , VI.7:
  • Much did the Craven seeme to mone his case […].
  • * Prior
  • Ye floods, ye woods, ye echoes, moan / My dear Columbo, dead and gone.
  • (obsolete) To distress (someone); to sadden.
  • * Beaumont and Fletcher
  • which infinitely moans me
  • To make a moan or similar sound.
  • To say in a moan, or with a moaning voice.
  • ‘Please don't leave me,’ he moaned .
  • (colloquial) To complain; to grumble.
  • Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * moaner * moany

    See also

    * murmur * protest * lament

    Anagrams

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