Mitigate vs Mediate - What's the difference?

mitigate | mediate |


As verbs the difference between mitigate and mediate

is that mitigate is to reduce, lessen, or decrease while mediate is to resolve differences, or to bring about a settlement, between conflicting parties.

As a adjective mediate is

acting through a mediating agency.

mitigate

English

Verb

(mitigat)
  • To reduce, lessen, or decrease.
  • * 1795
  • Measures are pursuing to prevent or mitigate the usual consequences of such outrages, and with the hope of their succeeding at least to avert general hostility.
  • * 1813
  • But in yielding to it the retaliation has been mitigated as much as possible, both in its extent and in its character...
  • * 1896
  • Then they tell us that vaccination will mitigate the disease that it will make it milder.
  • * 1901 — , ch 7
  • Then I discovered the brilliance of the landscape around was mitigated by blue spectacles.
  • * 1920
  • The plague had not been kind to him, yet had left him this small furry thing to mitigate his sorrow; and when one is very young, one can find great relief in the lively antics of a black kitten.
  • To downplay.
  • Synonyms

    * (to reduce or lessen) check, diminish, ease, lighten, mollify, pacify, palliate

    Antonyms

    * (to reduce or lessen) aggrandize, aggravate, exacerbate, incite, increase, intensify, irritate, worsen

    Coordinate terms

    * (l)

    mediate

    English

    Verb

    (mediat)
  • To resolve differences, or to bring about a settlement, between conflicting parties.
  • To intervene between conflicting parties in order to resolve differences or bring about a settlement.
  • To divide into two equal parts.
  • (Holder)
  • To act as an intermediary causal or communicative agent; convey
  • Adjective

  • Acting through a mediating agency.
  • * (Oliver Sacks)
  • Vygotsky saw the development of language and mental powers as neither learned, in the ordinary way, nor emerging epigenetically, but as being social and mediate in nature, as arising from the interaction of adult and child, and as internalizing the cultural instrument of language for the processes of thought.
  • Intermediate between extremes.
  • (Prior)
  • Gained or effected by a medium or condition.
  • (Francis Bacon)
  • * Sir W. Hamilton
  • An act of mediate knowledge is complex.

    Derived terms

    * mediately