Misfortune vs Misery - What's the difference?

misfortune | misery |


As nouns the difference between misfortune and misery

is that misfortune is bad luck while misery is great unhappiness; extreme pain of body or mind; wretchedness; distress; woe.

misfortune

English

Noun

  • (uncountable) bad luck
  • * 2012 , July 15. Richard Williams in Guardian Unlimited, Tour de France 2012: Carpet tacks cannot force Bradley Wiggins off track
  • Cycling's complex etiquette contains an unwritten rule that riders in contention for a race win should not be penalised for sheer misfortune .
    The worst tour I have ever had the misfortune to experience.
    It was my fortune, or misfortune , to be called to the office of Chief Executive without any previous political training. - Ulysses S. Grant
  • (countable) an undesirable event such as an accident
  • * 1839 , Charles Robert Darwin, The Voyage of the Beagle. , Chapter X
  • The snowstorm, which was the cause of their misfortune , happened in the middle of January, corresponding to our July, and in the latitude of Durham!
    She had to come to terms with a number of misfortunes .

    misery

    English

    Noun

    (miseries)
  • Great unhappiness; extreme pain of body or mind; wretchedness; distress; woe.
  • Ever since his wife left him you can see the misery on his face .
  • Cause of misery; calamity; misfortune.
  • (Extreme) poverty.
  • Greed; avarice.
  • Synonyms

    * see

    Derived terms

    * put out of one's misery