Pessimism vs Miserabilist - What's the difference?

pessimism | miserabilist |


As nouns the difference between pessimism and miserabilist

is that pessimism is a general belief that bad things will happen while miserabilist is one who is unhappy, or extols being miserable as a virtue; a philosopher of pessimism.

pessimism

Noun

(en-noun)
  • A general belief that bad things will happen.
  • The doctrine that this world is the worst of all possible worlds.
  • Antonyms

    * optimism

    miserabilist

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One who is unhappy, or extols being miserable as a virtue; a philosopher of pessimism.
  • * 1991 , Anthony Powell, Under review: further writings on writers, 1946-1989 , page 242
  • Gissing is never more of a miserabilist than when trying to be light-hearted.
  • * 2006 , Iain Sinclair, London: city of disappearances , page 314
  • An old, failed actor who lived on his own, he never had friends dropping by, because he was a bedridden inconsiderate miserabilist .
  • *'>citation
  • Usage notes

    Also appears as variant (miserablist) (without interconsonantal -i-''), but this latter is less common; likewise (miserabilism) (with ''-i-'') is more common than (miserablism) (without ''-i- ).

    Synonyms

    * See also * killjoy, spoilsport