Minor vs Stickle - What's the difference?

minor | stickle |


As nouns the difference between minor and stickle

is that minor is a person who is below the legal age of majority, consent, criminal responsibility or other adult responsibilities and accountabilities while stickle is (uk|dialect) a shallow rapid in a river.

As verbs the difference between minor and stickle

is that minor is to choose or have an area of secondary concentration as a student in a college or university while stickle is (obsolete) to act as referee or arbiter; to mediate.

As an adjective minor

is of little significance or importance.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

minor

English

Alternative forms

* minour (obsolete)

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Of little significance or importance.
  • The physical appearance of a candidate is a minor factor in recruitment.
  • *
  • There is now such an immense "microliterature" on hepatics that, beyond a certain point I have given up trying to integrate (and evaluate) every minor paper published—especially narrowly floristic papers.
  • (music) Of a scale which has lowered scale degrees three, six, and seven relative to major, but with the sixth and seventh not always lowered
  • a minor scale.
  • (music) being the smaller of the two intervals denoted by the same ordinal number
  • Synonyms

    * See also * See also

    Antonyms

    * major

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A person who is below the legal age of majority, consent, criminal responsibility or other adult responsibilities and accountabilities.
  • It is illegal to sell weapons to minors under the age of eighteen.
  • A subject area of secondary concentration of a student at a college or university, or the student who has chosen such a secondary concentration.
  • * I had so many credit hours of English, it became my minor .
  • * I became an English minor .
  • (mathematics) determinant of a square submatrix
  • Antonyms

    * (law) adult * major

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To choose or have an area of secondary concentration as a student in a college or university.
  • * I had so many credit hours of English, I decided to minor in it.
  • Anagrams

    *

    stickle

    English

    Verb

    (en-verb)
  • (obsolete) To act as referee or arbiter; to mediate.
  • To argue or struggle (for).
  • * 1897 , Henry James, What Maisie Knew :
  • ‘She has other people than poor little you to think about, and has gone abroad with them; so you needn't be in the least afraid she'll stickle this time for her rights.’
  • To raise objections; to argue stubbornly, especially over minor or trivial matters.
  • (obsolete) To separate, as combatants; hence, to quiet, to appease, as disputants.
  • * Drayton
  • Which [question] violently they pursue, / Nor stickled would they be.
  • (obsolete) To intervene in; to stop, or put an end to, by intervening.
  • * Sir Philip Sidney
  • They ran to him, and, pulling him back by force, stickled that unnatural fray.
  • (obsolete) To separate combatants by intervening.
  • * Dryden
  • When he [the angel] sees half of the Christians killed, and the rest in a fair way of being routed, he stickles betwixt the remainder of God's host and the race of fiends.
  • (obsolete) To contend, contest, or altercate, especially in a pertinacious manner on insufficient grounds.
  • * Hudibras
  • Fortune, as she's wont, turned fickle, / And for the foe began to stickle .
  • * Dryden
  • for paltry punk they roar and stickle
  • * Hazlitt
  • the obstinacy with which he stickles for the wrong

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (UK, dialect) A shallow rapid in a river.
  • (UK, dialect) The current below a waterfall.
  • * W. Browne
  • Patient anglers, standing all the day / Near to some shallow stickle or deep bay.

    Anagrams

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