Conflate vs Mingle - What's the difference?

conflate | mingle |


As verbs the difference between conflate and mingle

is that conflate is to bring (things) together and fuse (them) into a single entity while mingle is to mix; intermix; to combine or join, as an individual or part, with other parts, but commonly so as to be distinguishable in the product; to confuse; to confound.

As nouns the difference between conflate and mingle

is that conflate is (biblical criticism) a conflate text, one which conflates multiple version of a text together while mingle is (obsolete) a mixture.

As an adjective conflate

is (biblical criticism) combining elements from multiple versions of the same text.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

conflate

English

Verb

(conflat)
  • To bring (things) together and fuse (them) into a single entity.
  • To mix together different elements.
  • To fail to properly distinguish or keep separate (things); to treat (them) as equivalent.
  • Synonyms

    * (to bring together) fuse, meld * (mix together) mix, blend, coalesce, commingle, flux, immix, merge

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (biblical criticism) Combining elements from multiple versions of the same text.
  • * 1999 , Emanuel Tov, The Greek and Hebrew Bible: Collected Essays on the Septuagint :
  • Why the redactor created this conflate version, despite its inconsistencies, is a matter of conjecture.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (biblical criticism) A conflate text, one which conflates multiple version of a text together.
  • References

    Anagrams

    * ----

    mingle

    English

    (Webster 1913)

    Verb

    (mingl)
  • To mix; intermix; to combine or join, as an individual or part, with other parts, but commonly so as to be distinguishable in the product; to confuse; to confound.
  • * Bible, Exodus ix. 24
  • There was fire mingled with the hail.
    Across the city yesterday, there was a feeling of bittersweet reunion as streams of humanity converged and mingled at dozens of memorial services. New York Times
  • To associate or unite in society or by ties of relationship; to cause or allow to intermarry; to intermarry.
  • * Bible, Ezra ix. 2
  • The holy seed have mingled themselves with the people of those lands.
  • To deprive of purity by mixture; to contaminate.
  • * Henry Rogers
  • a mingled , imperfect virtue
  • (obsolete) To put together; to join.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • To make or prepare by mixing the ingredients of.
  • * (Nathaniel Hawthorne)
  • [He] proceeded to mingle another draught.
  • To become mixed or blended.
  • Derived terms

    * commingle

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A mixture.