Bindest vs Mindest - What's the difference?

bindest | mindest |


In archaic|lang=en terms the difference between bindest and mindest

is that bindest is (archaic) (bind) while mindest is (archaic) (mind).

As verbs the difference between bindest and mindest

is that bindest is (archaic) (bind) while mindest is (archaic) (mind).

bindest

English

Verb

(head)
  • (archaic) (bind)
  • ----

    bind

    English

    Verb

  • To tie; to confine by any ligature.
  • * (rfdate) (Shakespeare)
  • They that reap must sheaf and bind .
  • To cohere or stick together in a mass.
  • ''Just to make the cheese more binding
  • * (rfdate) (Mortimer)
  • clay binds by heat.
  • To be restrained from motion, or from customary or natural action, as by friction.
  • I wish I knew why the sewing machine binds up after I use it for a while.
  • To exert a binding or restraining influence.
  • These are the ties that bind .
  • To tie or fasten tightly together, with a cord, band, ligature, chain, etc.
  • to bind''' grain in bundles; to '''bind a prisoner.
  • To confine, restrain, or hold by physical force or influence of any kind.
  • Gravity binds the planets to the sun.
    Frost binds the earth.
  • * (rfdate) Job xxviii. 11.
  • He bindeth the floods from overflowing.
  • * (rfdate) Luke xiii. 16.
  • Whom Satan hath bound , lo, these eighteen years.
  • To couple.
  • (figuratively) To oblige, restrain, or hold, by authority, law, duty, promise, vow, affection, or other social tie.
  • to bind''' the conscience; to '''bind''' by kindness; '''bound''' by affection; commerce '''binds nations to each other.
  • * (rfdate) (Milton)
  • Who made our laws to bind us, not himself.
  • (legal) To put (a person) under definite legal obligations, especially, under the obligation of a bond or covenant.
  • (legal) To place under legal obligation to serve.
  • to bind''' an apprentice; '''bound out to service
  • To protect or strengthen by applying a band or binding, as the edge of a carpet or garment.
  • (archaic) To make fast (a thing) about or upon something, as by tying; to encircle with something.
  • to bind a belt about one
    to bind a compress upon a wound.
  • (archaic) To cover, as with a bandage.
  • to bind up a wound.
  • (archaic) To prevent or restrain from customary or natural action.
  • certain drugs bind the bowels.
  • To put together in a cover, as of books.
  • The three novels were bound together.
  • (computing) To associate an identifier with a value; to associate a variable name, method name, etc. with the content of a storage location.
  • * 2008 , Bryan O'Sullivan, John Goerzen, Donald Bruce Stewart, Real World Haskell (page 33)
  • We bind the variable n to the value 2, and xs to "abcd".
  • * 2009 , Robert Pickering, Beginning F# (page 123)
  • You can bind an identifier to an object of a derived type, as you did earlier when you bound a string to an identifier of type obj

    Synonyms

    * fetter, make fast, tie, fasten, restrain * bandage, dress * restrain, restrict, obligate * * indenture

    Derived terms

    * bind over - to put under bonds to do something, as to appear at court, to keep the peace, etc. * bind to - to contract; as, to bind one's self to a wife. * bind up in - to cause to be wholly engrossed with; to absorb in.

    Derived terms

    * bindweed

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • That which binds or ties.
  • A troublesome situation; a problem; a predicament or quandary.
  • Any twining or climbing plant or stem, especially a hop vine; a bine.
  • (music) A ligature or tie for grouping notes.
  • (chess) A strong grip or stranglehold on a position that is difficult for the opponent to break.
  • the Maróczy Bind

    Synonyms

    * See also

    References

    * *

    Anagrams

    * English irregular verbs ----

    mindest

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (archaic) (mind)

  • mind

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The ability for rational thought.
  • :
  • The ability to be aware of things.
  • :
  • The ability to remember things.
  • :
  • The ability to focus the thoughts.
  • :
  • Somebody that embodies certain mental qualities.
  • :
  • Judgment, opinion, or view.
  • :
  • Desire, inclination, or intention.
  • :
  • A healthy mental state.
  • :
  • :
  • *
  • *:“[…] it is not fair of you to bring against mankind double weapons ! Dangerous enough you are as woman alone, without bringing to your aid those gifts of mind suited to problems which men have been accustomed to arrogate to themselves.”
  • (lb) The non-material substance or set of processes in which consciousness, perception, affectivity, judgement, thinking, and will are based.
  • :
  • *1699 , , Heads designed for an essay on conversations
  • *:Study gives strength to the mind ; conversation, grace: the first apt to give stiffness, the other suppleness: one gives substance and form to the statue, the other polishes it.
  • *1854 , Samuel Knaggs, Unsoundness of Mind Considered in Relation to the Question of Responsibility for Criminal Acts , p.19:
  • *:The mind is that part of our being which thinks and wills, remembers and reasons; we know nothing of it except from these functions.
  • *1883 , (Howard Pyle), (The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood)
  • *:Thus they dwelled for nearly a year, and in that time Robin Hood often turned over in his mind many means of making an even score with the Sheriff.
  • *, chapter=7
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=

    Synonyms

    * (ability for rational thought) brain, head, intellect, intelligence, nous, psyche, reason, wit * (ability to be aware of things) awareness, consciousness, sentience * (ability to remember things) memory, recollection * (ability to focus the thoughts) attention, concentration, focus * (somebody that embodies certain mental qualities) genius, intellectual, thinker * judgment, judgement, idea, opinion, view * desire, disposition, idea, inclination, intention, mood * (healthy mental state) sanity * (process of ): cognition, learning

    Derived terms

    * aftermind * amind * bear in mind * be of one mind * blow someone's mind * breadth of mind * change one's mind * come to mind * foremind * give someone a piece of one's mind * have a mind like a sieve * have a mind of one's own * have in mind * hivemind * in one's right mind * Jedi mind tricks * know one's own mind * lose one's mind * make up one's mind * meeting of the minds * mind's ear * mind's eye * mind-blowing * mindboggling * mindful * mindless * month's mind * of one mind * of two minds * out of one's mind * overmind * philosophy of mind * presence of mind * put someone in mind of * read someone's mind * right-minded * spring to mind * to my mind * top of mind * undermind * year's mind

    See also

    * (wikipedia)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (now, regional) To remember.
  • * 1896 , , (A Shropshire Lad), XXXVII, lines 25-26:
  • The land where I shall mind you not / Is the land where all's forgot.
  • You should mind your own business.
  • * Addison
  • bidding him be a good child, and mind his book
  • (originally and chiefly in negative or interrogative constructions) To dislike, to object to; to be bothered by.
  • I wouldn't mind an ice cream right now.
  • (now, chiefly, North America, Ireland) To pay attention to; to listen attentively to, to obey.
  • * 2000 , (George RR Martin), A Storm of Swords , Bantam 2011, page 84:
  • ‘Should you ever have a son, Sansa, beat him frequently so he learns to mind you.’
  • To pay attention to (something); to keep one's mind on.
  • * Shakespeare
  • My lord, you nod: you do not mind the play.
  • To look after, to take care of, especially for a short period of time.
  • Would you mind my bag for me?
  • (chiefly, in the imperative) To make sure, to take care ((that)).
  • Mind you don't knock that glass over.
  • To be careful about.
  • * 2005 , Gillie Bolton, Reflective Practice: Writing And Professional Development , ISBN 9781848602120, page xv:
  • Bank Underground Station, London, is built on a curve, leaving a potentially dangerous gap between platform and carriage to trap the unwary. The loudspeaker voice instructs passengers to "Mind the gap": the boundary between train and platform.
  • (obsolete) To have in mind; to intend.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I mind to tell him plainly what I think.
    (Beaconsfield)
  • (obsolete) To put in mind; to remind.
  • * Fuller
  • He minded them of the mutability of all earthly things.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I do thee wrong to mind thee of it.

    Derived terms

    * mind one's p's and q's * mind the store

    Statistics

    * 1000 English basic words ----