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Laugh vs Mind - What's the difference?

laugh | mind |

As nouns the difference between laugh and mind

is that laugh is an expression of mirth particular to the human species; the sound heard in laughing; laughter while mind is the ability for rational thought.

As verbs the difference between laugh and mind

is that laugh is (label) to show mirth, satisfaction, or derision, by peculiar movement of the muscles of the face, particularly of the mouth, causing a lighting up of the face and eyes, and usually accompanied by the emission of explosive or chuckling sounds from the chest and throat; to indulge in laughter while mind is (now|regional) to remember.

laugh

English

Alternative forms

* laff (eye dialect) * laughe (archaic) * larf (Cockney eye dialect)

Noun

(en noun)
  • An expression of mirth particular to the human species; the sound heard in laughing; laughter.
  • * 1803 , (Oliver Goldsmith), The Poetical Works of Oliver Goldsmith, M.B.: With an Account of His Life , page 45:
  • And the loud laugh that spoke the vacant mind.
  • * 1869 , , Lectures and Addresses on Literary and Social Topics , page 87:
  • That man is a bad man who has not within him the power of a hearty laugh .
  • Something that provokes mirth or scorn.
  • * 1921 , (Ring Lardner), The Big Town: How I and the Mrs. Go to New York to See Life and Get Katie a Husband , The Bobbs-Merrill Company, page 73:
  • “And this rug,” he says, stomping on an old rag carpet. “How much do you suppose that cost?” ¶ It was my first guess, so I said fifty dollars. ¶ “That’s a laugh ,” he said. “I paid two thousand for that rug.”
  • * 1979 , (Monty Python), (Always Look on the Bright Side of Life)
  • Life's a piece of shit / When you look at it / Life's a laugh and death's a joke, it's true.
  • (label) A fun person.
  • * 2010 , (The Times), March 14, 2010, (Tamzin Outhwaite), the unlikely musical star
  • Outhwaite is a good laugh , yes, she knows how to smile: but deep down, she really is strong and stern.

    Synonyms

    * (expression of mirth) cackle, chortle, chuckle, giggle, guffaw, snicker, snigger, titter, cachinnation * (something that provokes mirth or scorn) joke, laughing stock

    Derived terms

    * barrel of laughs * belly laugh * bundle of laughs * evil laugh * a laugh a minute * for a laugh * have a laugh * have the last laugh * horselaugh * laughathon * laughless * laughlike * laughline * laugh machine * laughsome * laugh track * laughworthy * laughy * liquid laugh

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (label) To show mirth, satisfaction, or derision, by peculiar movement of the muscles of the face, particularly of the mouth, causing a lighting up of the face and eyes, and usually accompanied by the emission of explosive or chuckling sounds from the chest and throat; to indulge in laughter.
  • * c. 1602 , (William Shakespeare), (Troilus and Cressida) , act I, scene ii:
  • But there was such laughing! Queen Hecuba laugh' d that her eyes ran o'er.
  • * 1899 , (Stephen Crane),
  • The roars of laughter which greeted his proclamation were of two qualities; some men laughing' because they knew all about cuckoo-clocks, and other men ' laughing because they had concluded that the eccentric Jake had been victimised by some wise child of civilisation.
  • * 1979 , (Monty Python), (Always Look on the Bright Side of Life)
  • If life seems jolly rotten / There's something you've forgotten / And that's to laugh and smile and dance and sing.
  • To be or appear cheerful, pleasant, mirthful, lively, or brilliant; to sparkle; to sport.
  • * 1693 , (John Dryden), "Of the Pythagorean Philosophy", from the 15th book of Ovid's Metamorphoses
  • Then laughs the childish year, with flowerets crowned
  • * 1734 , (Alexander Pope), (An Essay on Man) , Chapter 3
  • In Folly’s cup ?till laughs the bubble Joy.
  • To make an object of laughter or ridicule; to make fun of; to deride; to mock.
  • * 1731-1735 , (Alexander Pope), (Moral Essays)
  • No wit to flatter left of all his store, No fool to laugh at, which he valu'd more.
  • * 1890 , (Oscar Wilde), (The Picture of Dorian Gray) , Chapter 3
  • There was something about him, Harry, that amused me. He was such a monster. You will laugh at me, I know, but I really went in and paid a whole guinea for the stage-box. To the present day I can't make out why I did so; and yet if I hadn't! – my dear Harry, if I hadn't, I would have missed the greatest romance of my life. I see you are laughing. It is horrid of you!"
  • * 1967 , (The Beatles), (Penny Lane)
  • On the corner is a banker with a motorcar / The little children laugh at him behind his back
  • (label) To affect or influence by means of laughter or ridicule.
  • * 1611 , (William Shakespeare), (The Tempest) , act II, scene i:
  • Will you laugh me asleep, for I am very heavy?
  • * 1611 , (William Shakespeare), (The Tempest) , act II, scene ii:
  • I shall laugh myself to death.
  • (label) To express by, or utter with, laughter.
  • * 1602 , (William Shakespeare), (Troilus and Cressida) , act I, scene iii:
  • From his deep chest laughs out a loud applause.
  • * 1866 , (Louisa May Alcott), (Behind A Mask)'' or, ''A Woman's Power ; Chapter 8
  • Fairfax addressed her as "my lady," she laughed her musical laugh, and glanced up at a picture of Gerald with eyes full of exultation.
  • * 1906 , (Jack London), (Moon-Face)
  • "You refuse to take me seriously," Lute said, when she had laughed her appreciation. "How can I take that Planchette rigmarole seriously?"

    Usage notes

    The simple past tense forms laught', '''laugh'd''' and '''low''' and the past participles '''laught''', '''laugh'd''' and ' laughen also exist, but are obsolete.

    Synonyms

    * (show mirth by peculiar movement of the muscles of the face) cackle, chortle, chuckle, giggle, guffaw, snicker, snigger, titter * See also

    Antonyms

    * (show mirth by peculiar movement of the muscles of the face) cry, weep

    Coordinate terms

    * (show mirth by peculiar movement of the muscles of the face) cry

    Derived terms

    * belly-laugh * burst out laughing * don't make me laugh * he who laughs last laughs best * he who laughs last laughs longest * laughable * laugh all the way to the bank * laugh away * laugh down * laugher * laughing * laugh in someone's face * laugh in the sleeve * laugh like a drain * laugh like a hyena * laugh off * laugh one out of * laugh one's head off * laugh on the other side of one's face * laugh out, laugh out loud * laugh out of the other corner of the mouth, laugh out of the other side of the mouth * laugh to scorn * laugh track * * LOL * outlaugh * unlaugh * you're having a laugh * you've got to laugh

    See also

    * aphonogelia * comedy * gelotology * funny * ha ha * tee hee, tee hee hee

    mind

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The ability for rational thought.
  • :
  • The ability to be aware of things.
  • :
  • The ability to remember things.
  • :
  • The ability to focus the thoughts.
  • :
  • Somebody that embodies certain mental qualities.
  • :
  • Judgment, opinion, or view.
  • :
  • Desire, inclination, or intention.
  • :
  • A healthy mental state.
  • :
  • :
  • *
  • *:“[…] it is not fair of you to bring against mankind double weapons ! Dangerous enough you are as woman alone, without bringing to your aid those gifts of mind suited to problems which men have been accustomed to arrogate to themselves.”
  • (lb) The non-material substance or set of processes in which consciousness, perception, affectivity, judgement, thinking, and will are based.
  • :
  • *1699 , , Heads designed for an essay on conversations
  • *:Study gives strength to the mind ; conversation, grace: the first apt to give stiffness, the other suppleness: one gives substance and form to the statue, the other polishes it.
  • *1854 , Samuel Knaggs, Unsoundness of Mind Considered in Relation to the Question of Responsibility for Criminal Acts , p.19:
  • *:The mind is that part of our being which thinks and wills, remembers and reasons; we know nothing of it except from these functions.
  • *1883 , (Howard Pyle), (The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood)
  • *:Thus they dwelled for nearly a year, and in that time Robin Hood often turned over in his mind many means of making an even score with the Sheriff.
  • *, chapter=7
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=

    Synonyms

    * (ability for rational thought) brain, head, intellect, intelligence, nous, psyche, reason, wit * (ability to be aware of things) awareness, consciousness, sentience * (ability to remember things) memory, recollection * (ability to focus the thoughts) attention, concentration, focus * (somebody that embodies certain mental qualities) genius, intellectual, thinker * judgment, judgement, idea, opinion, view * desire, disposition, idea, inclination, intention, mood * (healthy mental state) sanity * (process of ): cognition, learning

    Derived terms

    * aftermind * amind * bear in mind * be of one mind * blow someone's mind * breadth of mind * change one's mind * come to mind * foremind * give someone a piece of one's mind * have a mind like a sieve * have a mind of one's own * have in mind * hivemind * in one's right mind * Jedi mind tricks * know one's own mind * lose one's mind * make up one's mind * meeting of the minds * mind's ear * mind's eye * mind-blowing * mindboggling * mindful * mindless * month's mind * of one mind * of two minds * out of one's mind * overmind * philosophy of mind * presence of mind * put someone in mind of * read someone's mind * right-minded * spring to mind * to my mind * top of mind * undermind * year's mind

    See also

    * (wikipedia)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (now, regional) To remember.
  • * 1896 , , (A Shropshire Lad), XXXVII, lines 25-26:
  • The land where I shall mind you not / Is the land where all's forgot.
  • You should mind your own business.
  • * Addison
  • bidding him be a good child, and mind his book
  • (originally and chiefly in negative or interrogative constructions) To dislike, to object to; to be bothered by.
  • I wouldn't mind an ice cream right now.
  • (now, chiefly, North America, Ireland) To pay attention to; to listen attentively to, to obey.
  • * 2000 , (George RR Martin), A Storm of Swords , Bantam 2011, page 84:
  • ‘Should you ever have a son, Sansa, beat him frequently so he learns to mind you.’
  • To pay attention to (something); to keep one's mind on.
  • * Shakespeare
  • My lord, you nod: you do not mind the play.
  • To look after, to take care of, especially for a short period of time.
  • Would you mind my bag for me?
  • (chiefly, in the imperative) To make sure, to take care ((that)).
  • Mind you don't knock that glass over.
  • To be careful about.
  • * 2005 , Gillie Bolton, Reflective Practice: Writing And Professional Development , ISBN 9781848602120, page xv:
  • Bank Underground Station, London, is built on a curve, leaving a potentially dangerous gap between platform and carriage to trap the unwary. The loudspeaker voice instructs passengers to "Mind the gap": the boundary between train and platform.
  • (obsolete) To have in mind; to intend.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I mind to tell him plainly what I think.
    (Beaconsfield)
  • (obsolete) To put in mind; to remind.
  • * Fuller
  • He minded them of the mutability of all earthly things.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I do thee wrong to mind thee of it.

    Derived terms

    * mind one's p's and q's * mind the store

    Statistics

    * 1000 English basic words ----