Mind vs Apperception - What's the difference?

mind | apperception |


As nouns the difference between mind and apperception

is that mind is the ability for rational thought while apperception is (uncountable|psychology|and|philosophy|especially kantianism) the mind's perception of itself as the subject or actor in its own states, unifying past and present experiences; self-consciousness, perception that reflects upon itself.

As a verb mind

is .

mind

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • The ability for rational thought.
  • :
  • The ability to be aware of things.
  • :
  • The ability to remember things.
  • :
  • The ability to focus the thoughts.
  • :
  • Somebody that embodies certain mental qualities.
  • :
  • Judgment, opinion, or view.
  • :
  • Desire, inclination, or intention.
  • :
  • A healthy mental state.
  • :
  • :
  • *
  • *:“[…] it is not fair of you to bring against mankind double weapons ! Dangerous enough you are as woman alone, without bringing to your aid those gifts of mind suited to problems which men have been accustomed to arrogate to themselves.”
  • (lb) The non-material substance or set of processes in which consciousness, perception, affectivity, judgement, thinking, and will are based.
  • :
  • *1699 , , Heads designed for an essay on conversations
  • *:Study gives strength to the mind ; conversation, grace: the first apt to give stiffness, the other suppleness: one gives substance and form to the statue, the other polishes it.
  • *1854 , Samuel Knaggs, Unsoundness of Mind Considered in Relation to the Question of Responsibility for Criminal Acts , p.19:
  • *:The mind is that part of our being which thinks and wills, remembers and reasons; we know nothing of it except from these functions.
  • *1883 , (Howard Pyle), (The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood)
  • *:Thus they dwelled for nearly a year, and in that time Robin Hood often turned over in his mind many means of making an even score with the Sheriff.
  • *, chapter=7
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=

    Synonyms

    * (ability for rational thought) brain, head, intellect, intelligence, nous, psyche, reason, wit * (ability to be aware of things) awareness, consciousness, sentience * (ability to remember things) memory, recollection * (ability to focus the thoughts) attention, concentration, focus * (somebody that embodies certain mental qualities) genius, intellectual, thinker * judgment, judgement, idea, opinion, view * desire, disposition, idea, inclination, intention, mood * (healthy mental state) sanity * (process of ): cognition, learning

    Derived terms

    * aftermind * amind * bear in mind * be of one mind * blow someone's mind * breadth of mind * change one's mind * come to mind * foremind * give someone a piece of one's mind * have a mind like a sieve * have a mind of one's own * have in mind * hivemind * in one's right mind * Jedi mind tricks * know one's own mind * lose one's mind * make up one's mind * meeting of the minds * mind's ear * mind's eye * mind-blowing * mindboggling * mindful * mindless * month's mind * of one mind * of two minds * out of one's mind * overmind * philosophy of mind * presence of mind * put someone in mind of * read someone's mind * right-minded * spring to mind * to my mind * top of mind * undermind * year's mind

    See also

    * (wikipedia)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (now, regional) To remember.
  • * 1896 , , (A Shropshire Lad), XXXVII, lines 25-26:
  • The land where I shall mind you not / Is the land where all's forgot.
  • You should mind your own business.
  • * Addison
  • bidding him be a good child, and mind his book
  • (originally and chiefly in negative or interrogative constructions) To dislike, to object to; to be bothered by.
  • I wouldn't mind an ice cream right now.
  • (now, chiefly, North America, Ireland) To pay attention to; to listen attentively to, to obey.
  • * 2000 , (George RR Martin), A Storm of Swords , Bantam 2011, page 84:
  • ‘Should you ever have a son, Sansa, beat him frequently so he learns to mind you.’
  • To pay attention to (something); to keep one's mind on.
  • * Shakespeare
  • My lord, you nod: you do not mind the play.
  • To look after, to take care of, especially for a short period of time.
  • Would you mind my bag for me?
  • (chiefly, in the imperative) To make sure, to take care ((that)).
  • Mind you don't knock that glass over.
  • To be careful about.
  • * 2005 , Gillie Bolton, Reflective Practice: Writing And Professional Development , ISBN 9781848602120, page xv:
  • Bank Underground Station, London, is built on a curve, leaving a potentially dangerous gap between platform and carriage to trap the unwary. The loudspeaker voice instructs passengers to "Mind the gap": the boundary between train and platform.
  • (obsolete) To have in mind; to intend.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I mind to tell him plainly what I think.
    (Beaconsfield)
  • (obsolete) To put in mind; to remind.
  • * Fuller
  • He minded them of the mutability of all earthly things.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I do thee wrong to mind thee of it.

    Derived terms

    * mind one's p's and q's * mind the store

    Statistics

    * 1000 English basic words ----

    apperception

    Noun

  • (uncountable, psychology, and, philosophy, especially Kantianism) The mind's perception of itself as the subject or actor in its own states, unifying past and present experiences; self-consciousness, perception that reflects upon itself.
  • (uncountable) Psychological or mental perception; recognition.
  • * 2009 , Adam Roberts, Yellow Blue Tibia :
  • For as she smiled I was gifted a glimpse past the apperception of an anonymous spherical quantity of human flesh; and into the individual.
  • (countable, psychology) The general process or a particular act of mental assimilation of new experience into the totality of one's past experience.
  • References

    * * * * *" apperception" in Encyclopedia Britannica , 1911 ed. * Oxford English Dictionary , second edition (1989) * Random House Webster's Unabridged Electronic Dictionary (1987-1996) * Dictionary of Philosophy'', (ed.), Philosophical Library, 1962. ''See: "Apperception" by Otto F. Kkraushaar, p. 15.