What is the difference between milling and mill?

milling | mill | Derived terms |

Milling is a derived term of mill.


As nouns the difference between milling and mill

is that milling is the notches around the edge of a coin, placed there during minting so that it can be told if some of the metal from the edge is removed removing metal from a coin was common practice during earlier times when coins made of precious metals circulated while mill is a grinding apparatus for substances such as grains, seeds, etc or mill can be an obsolete coin with value one-thousandth of a dollar, or one-tenth of a cent.

As verbs the difference between milling and mill

is that milling is (mill) while mill is to grind or otherwise process in a mill or other machine.

milling

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • The series of notches around the edge of a coin, placed there during minting so that it can be told if some of the metal from the edge is removed. Removing metal from a coin was common practice during earlier times when coins made of precious metals circulated.
  • A grinding process using a mill
  • Verb

    (head)
  • mill

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (m), (etyl) (m).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A grinding apparatus for substances such as grains, seeds, etc.
  • The building housing such a grinding apparatus.
  • A machine used for expelling the juice, sap, etc., from vegetable tissues by pressure, or by pressure in combination with a grinding, or cutting process.
  • A machine for grinding and polishing.
  • A manufacturing plant for paper, steel, textiles, etc.
  • A building housing such a plant.
  • An establishment that handles a certain type of situation routinely, such as a divorce mill, etc.
  • (label) an engine
  • (label) a boxing match, fistfight
  • {{quote-book, year=1914
    , year_published=2009 , edition=HTML , editor= , author=Edgar Rice Burrows , title=The Mucker , chapter= citation , genre= , publisher=The Gutenberg Project , isbn= , page= , passage=The name of the "white hope" against whom Billy was to go was sufficient to draw a fair house, and there were some there who had seen Billy in other fights and looked for a good mill . }}
  • (label) A hardened steel roller with a design in relief, used for imprinting a reversed copy of the design in a softer metal, such as copper.
  • (label) An excavation in rock, transverse to the workings, from which material for filling is obtained.
  • (label) A passage underground through which ore is shot.
  • A milling cutter.
  • (label) A card or deck that relies on the strategy of putting cards directly from the draw pile into the discard pile.
  • Synonyms
    * factory, works
    Derived terms
    {{der3, , cog mill , miller , millhouse , milling , mill race, millrace , millstone , mill wheel, millwheel , paper mill , pecker mill , pulp mill , rice mill , rolling mill , run-of-the-mill , rumor mill, rumour mill , steel mill , trouble at t' mill , watermill , windmill}}

    Etymology 2

    Ultimately from (etyl) (m).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An obsolete coin with value one-thousandth of a dollar, or one-tenth of a cent.
  • One thousandth part, particularly in millage rates of property tax.
  • Synonyms
    * (one thousandth part) permille,
    Coordinate terms
    * (one thousandth part) * percent * basis point
    Derived terms
    * millage

    Etymology 3

    From the noun .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (label) To grind or otherwise process in a mill or other machine.
  • (label) To shape, polish, dress or finish using a machine.
  • (label) To engrave one or more grooves or a pattern around the edge of (a cylindrical object such as a coin).
  • To move about in an aimless fashion.
  • To swim underwater.
  • To beat; to pound.
  • * Rudyard Kipling
  • (Thackeray)
  • To pass through a fulling mill; to full, as cloth.
  • To roll (steel, etc.) into bars.
  • To make (drinking chocolate) frothy, as by churning.
  • (label) To place cards into the discard pile directly from the draw pile.
  • Synonyms
    * (move about in an aimless fashion) roam, wander
    Derived terms
    * millable * nonmilled * unmilled

    References

    * *