Cheese vs Mice - What's the difference?

cheese | mice |


As nouns the difference between cheese and mice

is that cheese is (uncountable) a dairy product made from curdled or cultured milk or cheese can be (slang) wealth, fame, excellence, importance while mice is (mouse).

As a verb cheese

is to prepare curds for making cheese or cheese can be (slang) to stop; to refrain from or cheese can be (gaming|slang) to use an unsporting tactic; to repeatedly use an attack which is overpowered or difficult to counter.

As an interjection cheese

is (photography).

cheese

English

(wikipedia cheese)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) chese, from (etyl) .

Noun

(en-noun)
  • (uncountable) A dairy product made from curdled or cultured milk.
  • (countable) Any particular variety of cheese.
  • (countable) A piece of cheese, especially one moulded into a large round shape during manufacture.
  • (uncountable, colloquial) That which is melodramatic, overly emotional, or , i.e. cheesy.
  • (uncountable, slang) Money.
  • (countable, UK) In skittles, the roughly ovoid object that is thrown to knock down the skittles.
  • (uncountable, slang, baseball) A fastball.
  • (uncountable, slang) A dangerous mixture of black tar heroin and crushed Tylenol PM tablets. The resulting powder resembles grated cheese and is snorted.
  • (vulgar, slang) Smegma.
  • (technology) Holed pattern of circuitry to decrease pattern density.
  • * 2006, US Patent 7458053, International Business Machines Corporation
  • It is known in the art to insert features that are electrically inactive (“fill structures”) into a layout to increase layout pattern density or and to remove features from the layout (“cheese structures”) to decrease layout pattern density.
  • A mass of pomace, or ground apples, pressed together in the shape of a cheese.
  • The flat, circular, mucilaginous fruit of the dwarf mallow (Malva rotundifolia ).
  • A low curtsey; so called on account of the cheese shape assumed by a woman's dress when she stoops after extending the skirts by a rapid gyration.
  • (De Quincey)
    (Thackeray)
    Hyponyms
    * See also
    Antonyms
    * fill (dummy pattern to increase pattern density)
    Derived terms
    * Abertam cheese * American cheese * apple-cheese * * Asiago cheese * basket cheese * bleu cheese * blue cheese * Bonchester cheese * bread and cheese * brick cheese * Brussels' cheese * Buxton Blue cheese * Cabrales cheese * Caerphilly cheese * Caithness cheese * Camembert cheese * cauliflower cheese * chalk and cheese * Chaumes cheese * Cheddar cheese * cheese and bread * cheese-bail * cheese board, cheese-board, cheeseboard * cheese-borer * cheese-bowl * cheese-box * cheese-bug * cheeseburger * cheese-cement * cheesecake * cheese cloth, cheesecloth, cheese-clout * cheese-cratch * cheese-crate * cheese curds * cheese-cutter, cheesecutter * cheesed, cheesed off * cheese dip * cheese dish * cheese down * cheese fingers * cheese fly * cheese grater * cheese-hake, cheese-heck * cheese-head * cheese-headed * cheese-hoop * cheese-hopper, cheesehopper * cheese-knife * cheese ladder * cheeseling * cheese-maggot * cheesemaker * cheese mite * cheese-moat * cheese-mold, cheese-mould * cheesemonger * cheese off * cheese-pale * cheese-parer * cheese-paring, cheeseparing * cheese-plate * cheese powder * cheese-press * cheeser * cheese rack/cheese-rack * cheese-ramekin * cheese-rennet * cheese-room * cheese-running * cheesery * the Cheeses * cheese-scoop * cheese skipper * cheese slaw * cheese slicer * cheese spread * cheese straw * cheese-taster * cheese-toaster * cheese-tub * cheese-vat * cheese-water * cheesewire * cheesewood * cheese-wring * cheesine * cheesing * cheesy * * Cheshire cheese * Chevington cheese * * Chihuahua cheese * cock cheese * Colby cheese * Colby-Jack cheese * Coon cheese * Cornish Yarg cheese * cotija cheese * cottage cheese * Cougar Gold cheese * cream cheese, cream-cheese * Criollo cheese * Cuba cheese * curd cheese * damson cheese, damson-cheese * Danish Blue cheese * Derby cheese * Dorset Blue Vinney cheese * Dorstone cheese * Double Gloucester cheese * Dovedale cheese * Duberry cheese * Dunlop cheese * Dutch cheese * * Edam cheese * Emmental cheese, Emmenthal cheese * Exmoor Blue cheese * farmer cheese, farmer's cheese * feta cheese * Gloucester cheese * goat cheese * Gouda cheese * Grana Padano cheese * grated cheese * green cheese * * hard cheese * head-cheese, headcheese, head cheese * hoop cheese * Horeb cheese * human cheese * Huntsman cheese * Idiazabal cheese * Ilchester cheese * jack cheese * * Jarlsberg cheese * Lancashire cheese * Leicester cheese * Leidse cheese, Leyden cheese * lemon cheese * Liederkranz cheese * Limburg cheese, Limburger cheese * Lincolnshire Poacher cheese * Lymeswold cheese * macaroni and cheese, macaroni cheese * make butter and cheese of * make cheeses * Manchego cheese * Maytag Blue cheese * mousetrap cheese * mozzarella cheese * Muenster cheese, Munster cheese, * Nabulsi cheese * * nipcheese * * Oaxaca cheese * Oka cheese * Parmesan cheese * pepper jack cheese * pick-cheese * pimento cheese * Pinconning cheese * pizza cheese * pot cheese * processed cheese * Provel cheese * rat cheese * Red Leicester cheese * Red Windsor cheese * ricotta cheese * romano cheese * ruen cheese * sage-cheese * Sage Derby cheese * * Sakura cheese * say cheese * Shropshire Blue cheese * Single Gloucester cheese * slip cheese * smoked cheese * sour milk cheese * Stilton cheese * Stinking Bishop cheese * store cheese * string cheese * Swaledale cheese * Swiss cheese * Testouri cheese * Teviotdale cheese * Tilsit cheese, Tilsiter cheese * tip-cheese * toad-cheese, toad's cheese * Tyrolean grey cheese * * * Waterloo cheese * Wensleydale cheese * White Stilton cheese * Yunnan cheese * Zamorano cheese
    See also
    * (wikipedia) * * butter * cream * milk * turophile * yogurt

    Verb

    (chees)
  • To prepare curds for making cheese.
  • (technology) To make holes in a pattern of circuitry to decrease pattern density.
  • Interjection

  • (photography)
  • Say "cheese "! ... and there we are!

    Etymology 2

    Probably from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (-)
  • (slang) Wealth, fame, excellence, importance.
  • Derived terms
    * big cheese * sub-cheese

    Etymology 3

    Verb

    (chees)
  • (slang) To stop; to refrain from.
  • (slang) To anger or irritate someone, usually in combination with "off".
  • All this waiting around is really cheesing me off.
    Derived terms
    * cheese it * cheesed off

    Etymology 4

    From cheesy.

    Verb

    (chees)
  • (gaming, slang) To use an unsporting tactic; to repeatedly use an attack which is overpowered or difficult to counter
  • You can cheese most of the game using certain exploits.
  • (gaming) To use an unconventional, all-in strategy to take one's opponent by surprise early in the game (especially for real-time strategy games)
  • It's not every day you can see someone defend a cheese maneuver with a planetary fortress and win the game without using a single unit.
    Synonyms
    * (use a surprise all-in strategy early in a game) rush, zerg 1000 English basic words

    mice

    English

    Noun

    (head)
  • (mouse)
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    mouse

    English

    Noun

    (mice)
  • Any small rodent of the genus Mus .
  • *
  • *:At twilight in the summer there is never anybody to fear—man, woman, or cat—in the chambers and at that hour the mice come out. They do not eat parchment or foolscap or red tape, but they eat the luncheon crumbs.
  • (lb) A member of the many small rodent and marsupial species resembling such a rodent.
  • A quiet or shy person.
  • (lb) (plural'' mice''' ''or, rarely,'' ' mouses ) An input device that is moved over a pad or other flat surface to produce a corresponding movement of a pointer on a graphical display.
  • (lb) Hematoma.
  • (lb) A turn or lashing of spun yarn or small stuff, or a metallic clasp or fastening, uniting the point and shank of a hook to prevent its unhooking or straighening out.
  • (lb)
  • :(Shakespeare)
  • A match used in firing guns or blasting.
  • (lb) A small model of (a fragment of) (Zermelo-Fraenkel set theory) with desirable properties (depending on the context).
  • Hypernyms

    * (small rodent) rodent

    Coordinate terms

    * (small rodent) rat * (input device) joystick, trackpad, trackball, pointing stick

    Derived terms

    * (as) quiet as a mouse * cat and mouse * church mouse * deer mouse * dormouse * fieldmouse * house mouse * kangaroo mouse * mouseable, mousable * mouse button * mouse click * mouse-ear * mouse mat * mouse pad * mouser * mousetrap * mousy * optical mouse * play cat and mouse * poor as a church mouse * when the cat's away the mice will play

    Verb

    (mous)
  • To move cautiously or furtively, in the manner of a mouse (the rodent) (frequently used in the phrasal verb to mouse around ).
  • To hunt or catch mice (the rodents), usually of cats.
  • (nautical) To close the mouth of a hook by a careful binding of marline or wire.
  • Captain Higgins moused the hook with a bit of marline to prevent the block beckets from falling out under slack.
  • (computing) To navigate by means of a computer mouse.
  • * 1988 , MacUser: Volume 4
  • I had just moused to the File menu and the pull-down menu repeated the menu bar's hue a dozen shades lighter.
  • * 2009 , Daniel Tunkelang, Faceted Search (page 35)
  • Unlike the Flamenco work, the Relation Browser allows users to quickly explore a document space using dynamic queries issued by mousing over facet elements in the interface.
  • (obsolete, nonce, transitive) To tear, as a cat devours a mouse.
  • * Shakespeare
  • [Death] mousing the flesh of men.

    Derived terms

    * mouse around * mouse over * mouser

    See also

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