Herry vs Merry - What's the difference?

herry | merry |


As a verb herry

is (obsolete) to honour, praise or celebrate or herry can be (transitive|obsolete|scotland).

As a proper noun merry is

originally a nickname for a merry person.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

herry

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) (m), (m), from (etyl) . See (l), (l).

Alternative forms

* (l)

Verb

  • (obsolete) To honour, praise or celebrate.
  • * 1596 , '', 1805, H. J. Todd (editorial notes), ''The Works of Edmund Spenser , page 185,
  • Thenceforth it firmely was e?tabli?hed, / And for Apolloes temple highly herried .
    Derived terms
    * (l) * (l)

    Etymology 2

    From earlier (m), from (etyl) (m), . More at (l).

    Alternative forms

    * (l)

    Verb

  • (transitive, obsolete, Scotland)
  • * 1728 , Robert Lindsay, Robert Freebairn, The History of Scotland: From 21 February, 1436, to March, 1565 , page 44,
  • In the Spring of the Year thereafter, this inte?tine War, within the Bowels of this Commonweal, began to increase ay more and more; and ?o continued two Years; during the which Time, the Dougla??es burnt and herried all Lands pertaining to the King and his A??i?ters; and al?o to them that were not plain on his Faction.
  • * 1822 , , The Three Perils of Man; Or, War, Women, and Witchcraft , page 228,
  • The heroic Sim flew to horse, and desired all that were friends to the Scots to follow, while Laidlaw addressed his compeers, saying, "Up, lads, and let us ride; our host must not be herried while we are under his roof."
  • * , The Deer-Stalkers of Glenskiach , 1840, page 38,
  • The victories of Inverlochy, of Alderne, and of Alford, the herrying of Argyleshire, and the sacking of Dundee, could scarcely make up for the terrible toils encountered in climhing the bleak precipices of the west, in wading through drifts of snow among the mountains during the depths of winter,.
    Derived terms
    * (l) * (l)

    merry

    English

    Alternative forms

    * (l) (obsolete)

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Jolly and full of high spirits
  • We had a very merry Christmas.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I am never merry when I hear sweet music.
  • Festive and full of fun and laughter
  • * 1883 , (Howard Pyle), (The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood)
  • f I have the chance, I will make our worshipful Sheriff pay right well for that which he hath done to me. Maybe I may bring him some time into Sherwood Forest and have him to a right merry feast with us.
    Everyone was merry at the party.
  • Brisk
  • The play moved along at a merry pace.
  • Causing laughter, mirth, gladness, or delight.
  • a merry jest
  • * Spenser
  • merry wind and weather
  • (euphemistic) drunk; tipsy
  • Some of us got a little merry at the office Christmas party.

    Alternative forms

    * (obsolete) mery

    Derived terms

    * Merry Christmas * Merry Eid

    Synonyms

    * happy * gay * content * joyful * cheerful * pleased * exultant * ecstatic * jovial

    Antonyms

    * miserable * unhappy

    Derived terms

    * merrier * merrily * merriment