Dere vs Mere - What's the difference?

dere | mere |


As nouns the difference between dere and mere

is that dere is door while mere is fear, awe.

As an adjective dere

is bitter.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

dere

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) dere, from (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • Hurt; harm; injury.
  • She did him dere .

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) deren, derien, from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (der)
  • To hurt; harm; injure; wound.
  • * c.1390 , Geoffrey Chaucer, ‘The Squire's Tale’, Canterbury Tales :
  • And of Achilles with his queynte spere, / For he koude with it bothe heele and dere .
  • * :
  • Thenne herd he a voyse say / Galahad I see there enuyronne aboute the so many angels that my power may not dere the /
  • To annoy, trouble, grieve.
  • Derived terms
    *

    Anagrams

    * ----

    mere

    English

    (wikipedia mere)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) mere, from (etyl) .

    Alternative forms

    * (l), (l), (l)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) the sea
  • (dialectal, or, literary) a pool; a small lake or pond; marsh
  • (Drayton)
    (Tennyson)
  • * 1955 , William Golding, The Inheritors , Faber & Faber 2005, p. 194:
  • Lok got to his feet and wandered along by the marshes towards the mere where Fa had disappeared.
    Derived terms
    * mereswine * mermaid * merman * merfolk

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl), from (etyl) .

    Alternative forms

    * (l), (l), (l), (l)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • boundary, limit; a boundary-marker; boundary-line
  • * 1590 , Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene , III.ix:
  • The Troian Brute'' did first that Citie found, / And ''Hygate'' made the meare thereof by West, / And ''Ouert gate by North: that is the bound / Toward the land; two riuers bound the rest.

    Verb

    (mer)
  • (obsolete) To limit; bound; divide or cause division in.
  • (obsolete) To set divisions and bounds.
  • Etymology 3

    From (etyl), from (etyl) .

    Alternative forms

    * (l), (l)

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete) famous.
  • Etymology 4

    From (etyl) meer, from (etyl) mier, from (etyl) merus. Perhaps influenced by (etyl) , or conflated with Etymology 3.

    Adjective

    (er)
  • (label) Pure, unalloyed .
  • * 1590 , (Edmund Spenser), The Faerie Queene , III.8:
  • So oft as I this history record, / My heart doth melt with meere compassion.
  • * , I.56:
  • Meere .
  • (label) Nothing less than; complete, downright .
  • * , II.3.7:
  • If every man might have what he wouldwe should have another chaos in an instant, a meer confusion.
  • Just, only; no more than , pure and simple, neither more nor better than might be expected.
  • *
  • Thus the red damask curtains which now shut out the fog-laden, drizzling atmosphere of the Marylebone Road, had cost a mere song, and yet they might have been warranted to last another thirty years. A great bargain also had been the excellent Axminster carpet which covered the floor;.
  • * {{quote-book, year=2006, author=(Edwin Black)
  • , chapter=2, title= Internal Combustion , passage=More than a mere source of Promethean sustenance to thwart the cold and cook one's meat, wood was quite simply mankind's first industrial and manufacturing fuel.}}
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2012-03
  • , author=, volume=100, issue=2, page=106 , magazine=(American Scientist) , title= Pixels or Perish , passage=Drawings and pictures are more than mere ornaments in scientific discourse. Blackboard sketches, geological maps, diagrams of molecular structure, astronomical photographs, MRI images, the many varieties of statistical charts and graphs: These pictorial devices are indispensable tools for presenting evidence, for explaining a theory, for telling a story.}}
    Derived terms
    * merely

    Etymology 5

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • a Maori war-club
  • Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * ----