Mental vs Pang - What's the difference?

mental | pang |


As nouns the difference between mental and pang

is that mental is (zoology) a plate or scale covering the mentum or chin of a fish or reptile while pang is (often|pluralized) paroxysm of extreme physical pain or anguish; sudden and transitory agony;throe.

As a adjective mental

is of or relating to the mind or an intellectual process.

As a verb pang is

to torment; to torture; to cause to have great pain or suffering.

mental

English

(wikipedia mental)

Adjective

(-)
  • Of or relating to the mind or an intellectual process.
  • *
  • *:“I don't mean all of your friends—only a small proportion—which, however, connects your circle with that deadly, idle, brainless bunch—the insolent chatterers at the opera,, the neurotic victims of mental cirrhosis, the jewelled animals whose moral code is the code of the barnyard—!"
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-19, author= Ian Sample
  • , volume=189, issue=6, page=34, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Irregular bedtimes may affect children's brains , passage=Irregular bedtimes may disrupt healthy brain development in young children, according to a study of intelligence and sleeping habits.  ¶ Going to bed at a different time each night affected girls more than boys, but both fared worse on mental tasks than children who had a set bedtime, researchers found.}}
  • Insane, mad, crazy.
  • :
  • Enjoyable; fun.
  • :
  • (lb) Of or relating to the chin or median part of the lower jaw, genial.
  • :
  • (lb) Of or relating to the chin-like or lip-like structure.
  • Synonyms

    * genial (in the sense referring to the chin) * genian (in the sense referring to the chin)

    Derived terms

    * extramental * intermental * intramental * mentalese * mentalist * mentality * mentally * mental age * mental block * mental disease * mental home * mental patient

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (zoology) A plate or scale covering the mentum or chin of a fish or reptile.
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    pang

    English

    (Webster 1913)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (often, pluralized) paroxysm of extreme physical pain or anguish; sudden and transitory agony; throe
  • * 1591 , , Henry VI, Part II , act 3, sc. 3,
  • See, how the pangs of death do make him grin!
  • * 1888 , , "The Nightingale and the Rose" in The Happy Prince and Other Tales ,
  • So the Nightingale pressed closer against the thorn, and the thorn touched her heart, and a fierce pang of pain shot through her.
  • (often, pluralized) A sharp, sudden feeling of a mental or emotional nature, as of joy or sorrow
  • * 1867 , , The Guardian Angel , ch. 7,
  • He was startled with a piece of information which gave him such an exquisite pang of delight that he could hardly keep the usual quiet of his demeanor.

    Verb

  • to torment; to torture; to cause to have great pain or suffering
  • * 1918 , , "On Unanswering Letters" in Mince Pie ,
  • It panged him so to say good-bye when he had to leave.