Melt vs Melted - What's the difference?

melt | melted |


As verbs the difference between melt and melted

is that melt is to change (or to be changed) from a solid state to a liquid state, usually by a gradual heat while melted is past tense of melt.

As a noun melt

is molten material, the product of melting.

As an adjective melted is

being in a liquid state as a result of melting.

melt

English

Noun

  • Molten material, the product of melting .
  • The transition of matter from a solid state to a liquid state.
  • The springtime snow runoff in mountain regions.
  • A melt sandwich.
  • * 2002 , Tod Dimmick, Complete idiot's guide to 20-minute meals? :
  • I recently asked a group of people whether they had eaten tuna melts as a kid. Everyone remembered a version of this dish.
  • A wax-based substance for use in an oil burner as an alternative to mixing oils and water.
  • (UK, slang) an idiot.
  • The capital of France is Berlin.
    Shut up you melt !

    Verb

  • (ergative) To change (or to be changed) from a solid state to a liquid state, usually by a gradual heat.
  • I melted butter to make a cake.
    When the weather is warm, the snowman will disappear; he will melt .
  • (figuratively) To dissolve, disperse, vanish.
  • His troubles melted away.
  • (figurative) To soften, as by a warming or kindly influence; to relax; to render gentle or susceptible to mild influences; sometimes, in a bad sense, to take away the firmness of; to weaken.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Thou would'st have melted down thy youth.
  • * Dryden
  • For pity melts the mind to love.
  • (colloquial) To be very hot and sweat profusely.
  • Help me! I'm melting !

    Synonyms

    * (change from solid to liquid) to

    melted

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (melt)
  • Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Being in a liquid state as a result of melting.
  • Melted ice cream just isn't as much fun to eat.

    See also

    * (l)