Meditate vs Muse - What's the difference?

meditate | muse |


As verbs the difference between meditate and muse

is that meditate is to contemplate; to keep the mind fixed upon something; to study while muse is to become lost in thought, to ponder.

As a noun muse is

a source of inspiration or muse can be an act of musing; a period of thoughtfulness or muse can be a gap or hole in a hedge, fence, etc through which a wild animal is accustomed to pass; a muset.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

meditate

English

(meditation)

Verb

  • To contemplate; to keep the mind fixed upon something; to study.
  • To sit or lie down and come to a deep rest while still remaining conscious.
  • Synonyms

    * See also

    muse

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) muse, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (s)
  • A source of inspiration.
  • (archaic) A poet; a bard.
  • (Milton)
    Usage notes
    The plural musae'' can also be found, though it is much rarer than ''muses .

    Etymology 2

    First attested in 1340. From (etyl) muser.

    Verb

    (mus)
  • To become lost in thought, to ponder.
  • To say (something) with due consideration or thought.
  • * (seeCites)
  • To think on; to meditate on.
  • * (rfdate) Thomson
  • Come, then, expressive Silence, muse his praise.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-07, author=David Simpson
  • , volume=188, issue=26, page=36, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Fantasy of navigation , passage=It is tempting to speculate about the incentives or compulsions that might explain why anyone would take to the skies in [the] basket [of a balloon]: […];  […]; or perhaps to muse on the irrelevance of the borders that separate nation states and keep people from understanding their shared environment.}}
  • To wonder at.
  • (Shakespeare)
    Synonyms
    * See also

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An act of musing; a period of thoughtfulness.
  • * 1590 , (Edmund Spenser), The Faerie Queene , I.xii:
  • still he sate long time astonished / As in great muse , ne word to creature spake.
  • * 1978 , (Lawrence Durrell), Livia , Faber & Faber 1992 (Avignon Quintet), p. 416:
  • He fell into a muse and pulled his upper lip.

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) musse. See muset.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A gap or hole in a hedge, fence, etc. through which a wild animal is accustomed to pass; a muset.
  • Find a hare without a muse . (old proverb)

    Anagrams

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