Meader vs Meander - What's the difference?

meader | meander |


As nouns the difference between meader and meander

is that meader is a mower or meader can be (obsolete) meadow while meander is a winding, crooked, or involved course.

As a verb meander is

to wind or turn in a course or passage; to be intricate.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

meader

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) *.

Noun

(en noun)
  • A mower.
  • Etymology 2

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) Meadow.
  • Anagrams

    *

    meander

    English

    Alternative forms

    * (archaic)

    Noun

    (wikipedia meander) (en noun)
  • A winding, crooked, or involved course.
  • the meanders of an old river, or of the veins and arteries in the body
  • * Sir R. Blackmore
  • While lingering rivers in meanders glide.
  • A tortuous or intricate movement.
  • Fretwork.
  • (math) A self-avoiding closed curve which intersects a line a number of times.
  • Derived terms

    * meander belt * meanderer * meandering * meanderian * meanderic * meanderiform * meanderine * meander line * meander loop * meandrous * meandry

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To wind or turn in a course or passage; to be intricate.
  • The stream meandered through the valley.
  • To wind, turn, or twist; to make flexuous.
  • (Dryton)

    References

    * The Chambers Dictionary (1998)

    Anagrams

    * *